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FEATURED NEWS FEEDS


NEWS (LAST 200)
Nikkei hits new highs after Japan electi...
President Trump on North Korea: 'We...
Abe, Trump agree to raise pressure on No...
Samoan firefighters sing hymn while batt...
Malaysia Airlines picks new CEO after st...
Graham: Troops Were in Niger 'To De...
Police arrest man in relation to Greymou...
Public backs ban on long unpaid internsh...
Brexit battle on hold as Theresa May put...
Four-star feud between White House, cong...
The Latest: IS oil production is greatly...
Donald Trump Jr. Just Shared The Weirdes...
Abes focus on North Korea after Japan el...
Unsent letter from Titanic passenger set...
Macris coalition sweeps Argentinas mid-t...
Political Roundup: NZs radical new gover...
Revealed: Einstein’s secret to happine...
Armed police surround Arahura Marae in s...
John McCain Slams Wealthy Draft Dodgers ...
Concern for future of bees after fall in...
French presidents dog interrupts meeting...
Ice tsunamis on the edge of the Earth...
23/10/2017: NATIONAL: Craft beer startup...
23/10/2017: NATIONAL: Wales reveals plan...
23/10/2017: INTERNATIONAL: Afghanistan u...
23/10/2017: INTERNATIONAL: Thais prepare...
Tampa Police Search for Possible Serial ...
23/10/2017: OBITUARIES: Other lives...
23/10/2017: LETTERS: Why should newspape...
23/10/2017: INTERNATIONAL: Japan’s Abe...
23/10/2017: LETTERS: British novelists n...
23/10/2017: THE CRITICS: More anguish th...
23/10/2017: OPINION: Don’t let the rig...
23/10/2017: NATIONAL: Rosemary Leach, st...
23/10/2017: NATIONAL: Plan to make EU na...
23/10/2017: INTERNATIONAL: WHO drops Mug...
23/10/2017: NATIONAL: Defendants’ righ...
23/10/2017: NATIONAL: Fracking activists...
Trump: Raqqa fall 'critical breakthr...
23/10/2017: NEWS: Viewers complain of ...
Republican official 'would have sho...
If Russia Ever Invades the Baltics, This...
23/10/2017: PUZZLES & CROSSWORD: Wordsea...
23/10/2017: THE CRITICS: From the Dorche...
23/10/2017: OBITUARIES: Birthdays
23/10/2017: LETTERS: Oxford could change...
23/10/2017: INTERNATIONAL: 311
23/10/2017: FRONT PAGE: How I learned to...
23/10/2017: NATIONAL: Hundreds are back ...
23/10/2017: FRONT PAGE: Madrid denies st...
23/10/2017: NATIONAL: Postnatal depressi...
23/10/2017: OPINION: Do we feel no sympa...
23/10/2017: NATIONAL: Britain feels the ...
23/10/2017: NATIONAL: Watson: end Sky de...
23/10/2017: PUZZLES & CROSSWORD: Cell Bl...
23/10/2017: PUZZLES & CROSSWORD: Wordwhe...
23/10/2017: FINANCIAL: Brexit uncertaint...
23/10/2017: NEWS: May poised for U-turn ...
23/10/2017: THE CRITICS: Rootless exiles...
23/10/2017: WEATHER: Country Diary...
23/10/2017: PUZZLES & CROSSWORD: Codewor...
23/10/2017: PUZZLES & CROSSWORD: Guardia...
23/10/2017: INTERNATIONAL: Czech tycoon ...
23/10/2017: FRONT PAGE: Hostages freed i...
23/10/2017: FINANCIAL: Dublin lobbies to...
23/10/2017: WEATHER: Specieswatch
23/10/2017: INTERNATIONAL: Catalonia cri...
23/10/2017: INTERNATIONAL: Conspiracy th...
23/10/2017: NATIONAL: Javid hints at bor...
23/10/2017: FRONT PAGE: Spurs and Arsena...
23/10/2017: LETTERS: The power of speech...
Graham: Trump Administration 'Has a...
23/10/2017: NATIONAL: Suspected murder a...
23/10/2017: INTERNATIONAL: Five in a row...
23/10/2017: INTERNATIONAL: Kenyans likel...
23/10/2017: NEWS: Attenborough defends s...
23/10/2017: PUZZLES & CROSSWORD: Killer ...
23/10/2017: NATIONAL: Spain holds out ho...
23/10/2017: NATIONAL: LGBT charity’s r...
23/10/2017: NATIONAL: Remove child-frien...
23/10/2017: NATIONAL: Hawking puts PhD t...
23/10/2017: NATIONAL: Art fair’s ‘ta...
23/10/2017: NATIONAL: More than Moomins ...
Macrons dog interrupts meeting
23/10/2017: NATIONAL: Shipshape at Trafa...
23/10/2017: NATIONAL: Johnson backs push...
23/10/2017: FRONT PAGE: Business chiefs ...
23/10/2017: INTERNATIONAL: Wee? Oui. How...
President Macris coalition ahead in cruc...
Armed police surround Arahura Marae in s...
Meet the 24-year-old female pilot taking...
Naval Showdown: What Happens When a Batt...
23/10/2017: LETTERS: Social care funding...
23/10/2017: NATIONAL: Feminist writer cl...
23/10/2017: NATIONAL: Prison staff to ge...
23/10/2017: PUZZLES & CROSSWORD: Suguru...
23/10/2017: NATIONAL: Briton gets three-...
23/10/2017: OPINION: As Isis loses the w...
23/10/2017: LETTERS: Corrections and cla...
23/10/2017: FRONT PAGE: Will it save our...
Man runs himself over in bizarre road ra...
23/10/2017: OPINION: Theresa May’s leg...
23/10/2017: NATIONAL: We must kill ‘al...
May looks anxious, despondent and dishea...
23/10/2017: NATIONAL: 30%
23/10/2017: MEDIA: In black and white: p...
23/10/2017: FINANCIAL: 125,000
Titanic letter revealing unparalleled sn...
23/10/2017: WEATHER: World Pollutionwatc...
23/10/2017: LETTERS: Universal credit’...
23/10/2017: JOURNAL: Owning a car will s...
23/10/2017: FINANCIAL: Paddington 2 film...
23/10/2017: FINANCIAL: Energy firms in a...
23/10/2017: FINANCIAL: 1930s show econom...
23/10/2017: OPINION: Voters screamed for...
Mother, son and daughter all arrested in...
Niger Ambush: Funeral Held for Sgt. La D...
Justin Timberlake to perform at Super Bo...
'Unprecedented' $1.18 Million ...
President Donald Trump finds unlikely al...
Melania Trumps White House costs reveale...
Arrest after man pushed off Mount Maunga...
Mark Richardsons $6 latte tweet causes s...
Labour weekend traffic: Long delays in C...
McCain appears to mock Trumps draft defe...
NCAA called out in "The Business of Amat...
Fire fall 3-0 at Houston Dynamo in final...
Polk Audio TSX 150c central channel spea...
Meraki MR 66 and Meraki Ant-11 (greenwic...
Brand New* WD 3TB Black My Passport Ultr...
Polk Audio Center Channel & 4 Satellite ...
Chuck Low, Robert De Niros landlord who ...
Brown defends delta tunnels as he rolls ...
Like New* Amazon Kindle Fire 7" HD table...
Computers and game accessories (Midtown ...
Sunday Morning Alt.Latino Serenade: Four...
Apple iPod Nano, 16GB, Space Gray (7th G...
Nintendo 3DS LL(XL) Super Mario Bros. 2 ...
New Jersey home priced at $10 — but co...
Cascadia Cup: 2017 schedule, standings a...
Sony TV - with converter & antenna (Stam...
Last of the prototypes for Trumps border...
8" Digital Photo Frame: 720p LCD Wi-Fi C...
Like New* Amped Wireless High Power Dual...
Canon 600EX RT with Eneloop Batteries an...
Winning the party endorsement is like tr...
Senate Holds Confirmation Hearing For Tr...
Post-Sandy, Financial District is now th...
Former Iraqi President Jalal Talabani di...
How 2016 real estate predictions did —...
BPM, A Pulse-Quickening, Personalized Dr...
Inside Michael Jacksons Neverland Ranch...
Chelsea win first step after bad form: C...
Nemanja Nikolic tops MLS scoring charts ...
Marseille fans clash with police ahead o...
Karolina Pliskova eases past Venus Willi...
Mesut Ozil will be missed at Arsenal aft...
Toronto FC take pride in setting MLS reg...
Coach Schmetzer wont let "one play derai...
███ 12ft 12 feet COAXIAL 6ft 6 fee...
Gov. Cuomo still has not posted capital ...
LG55CP6 3D 4K CURVED OLED HIGH END TV 20...
Like New, Fast* Lenovo L420 14.1" i5 @2....
Panasonic 55" 120hz 3D Smart WiFi 1080p ...
SONY DVD/SACD/CD/VCD (Norwalk, CT) �...
Despite probe into Cuomo administration,...
42"LG Television & stand (Bronx) $...
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The Forgotten Parsley Massacre Still Pla...
Trump To Values Voters: In America We Do...
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Digby Diehl dies at 76; former L.A. Time...
Reps. Issa and Hunter confronted by prot...
Dan Browns Pits Creationism Against Scie...
Latino activists vow more Trump protests...
Tom Petty, Heartbreakers frontman and be...
Joseph Percoco probe raises lots of unan...
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SAMSUNG SMART 2017 MODEL 4K HDR QLED 75 ...
Arthur Janov dies at 93; primal scream p...
Nemanja Nikolic reacts to winning 2017 M...
Atlanta United break attendance records,...
PS4 Slim Uncharted - 500 GB - 2 Controll...
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New York Red Bulls Sacha Kljestan wins t...
USC doesnt put up much of a fight in 49-...
The sight of the century
Playoff-bound San Jose Earthquakes keep ...
Stephen Curry insists he DIDNT throw mou...
Everton 2-5 Arsenal: Nine things you may...
Vidic opens up on Ferguson and risking i...
Destiny 2s PC Preload Is Now Available, ...
Super Mario Odyssey: Release Date, Featu...
█ 2 HDMI CABLES (5FT & 6FT) (FLUSHING)...

REVIEWS & PREVIEWS (LAST 60)
Fujifilm X-E3 First impressions review...
2017 Roundup: Enthusiast Long Zoom Camer...
FIFA 18 Nintendo Switch Review
2017 Roundup: Fixed Prime Lens Cameras...
2017 Roundup: Interchangeable Lens Camer...
Sigma sd Quattro H Review
OnePlus 3T Review
Leica SL (Typ 601) Review
Insta360 Air 360-degree camera for Andro...
Fujifilm X-T20 Review
Forza Motorsport 7 Review
Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ2500/FZ2000 Review...
The Photographers Guide To Northumberlan...
Curious Cameras
How To Photograph The Buzz Of Towns And ...
Win A Paintshop Pro 2018 Software Bundle...
Mad Max: Fury Road Review
Pitch Perfect 2 Review
Little Boy Review
Tomorrowland Review
Battle Chasers: Nightwar Review
Sam Farmers NFL picks for Week 7
Trump shares report on Islamic State def...
The Age of Adaline Review
The Water Diviner Review
The Avengers: Age of Ultron Review...
Huawei P10 Review
Poltergeist Review
Golf Story Review
The Flame in the Flood Review
The Evil Within 2 Review
Fujifilm GFX 50S Review
Nikon D7500 Review
Elex Review
2017 Roundup: Semi-Pro Interchangeable L...
Canon EOS 6D Mark II Review
OnePlus 5 camera review
The Photographers Guide To Scotland...
Pentax KP Review
Fujifilm X-A3 Review
Olympus OM-D E-M10 III Review
2017 Roundup: Interchangeable Lens Camer...
Canon EOS Rebel T7i / EOS 800D / Kiss X9...
Dodgers shortstop Corey Seager to test i...
Canon EOS M6 Review
2017 Roundup: Compact Enthusiast Zoom Ca...
Sony Alpha a99 II Review
Nikon D5600 Review
Nikon D850 Review
Autumn Bad Weather Landscape Tips
6 Photography Tutorials You Can Try With...
New Fluid Gimbal Head & Bag Collection F...
Gitzo Takes Over Wex Photo Video For The...
How To Spot The Red-Crested Pochard...
My Image Has Been Stolen, What Do I Do?...
Dodgers are three outs away from first W...
Fridays TV highlights: Great Performance...
LAPD investigating Harvey Weinstein afte...
Dodgers-Cubs Game 5 live: Enrique Hernan...
Enrique Hernandez hits his third homer o...


FIFA 18 on Nintendo Switch is a tough game to categorize. When compared to the likes of FIFA's past PS Vita, 3DS, and other mobile versions, it's easily the best portable FIFA ever made. But compared to its current console cousin--FIFA 18 on PS4 / Xbox One--it's lacking features and much of the shine that makes that version so appealing.

On the pitch, it actually replicates the other editions' gameplay pretty well. Dribbling feels responsive, crosses are accurate, and overall match speed is faster than on PS4 / Xbox One, a change that better suits the Switch's immediate pick-up-and-play sensibilities. Commentary is also just as impressive, and animations look as smooth as they do on current-gen (though you're better off not looking at the cardboard cut-out crowds). Shots don't pop like they do on PS4 and Xbox One, and the omission of player instructions is a frustrating and bizarre one. But playing a match of FIFA 18 on Switch is an enjoyable experience.

The problems arise when you consider the game as a package. FIFA's Switch port is missing Pro Clubs and The Journey, meaning the only options to play offline are the bog standard Kick Off and aging Career Mode. I say "aging" because the Career Mode here is not the one included in FIFA 18 on PS4 and Xbox One--it's more like the Career Mode seen in FIFA 16. It does not include the latest additions of dynamic news clips or interactive transfer negotiations because--like The Journey--they are powered by the Frostbite engine, which FIFA 18 on Switch does not use. With such a faithful recreation seen on the pitch, it's disappointing that attention to detail is not reflected off it.

This means that, despite feeling good when you're in a match, FIFA 18 doesn't really offer much to do when you're not connected to the internet. The Journey in particular would've been a perfect fit for a portable FIFA--a match on the way to work, another on the way home--but its omission leaves the only proper mode, save for the aforementioned Career Mode, as Ultimate Team.

FUT is, again, replicated well--it looks and plays like the real deal, and contains much of the live content the other versions boast, like Team of the Week and SBCs. However, once again, the Switch edition is missing the mode's big new feature for this season, FUT Squad Battles. Ironically, Squad Battles are the feature that would have fit this version of Ultimate Team best--as a single-player portion, it would've been perfect to play a couple of matches while on the bus and have the game sync when I get home. Unfortunately, they're missing from this version, and you can't even access FUT's menus when you're not connected to EA's servers. Of course, you can play it when you get home, but you'll be playing a version of Ultimate Team missing many of the PS4 / Xbox One versions' innovations from the past couple of years.

One advantage the Switch version has over the home console edition is the ability to play with a friend while on the go. FIFA 18 supports single Joy-Con play, meaning I was able to play football on my Switch against my brother on the way to an actual football match this weekend. It works, but I always felt l was struggling against the controls--fewer buttons and only one stick means there's no way to use finesse shots, threaded through balls, knuckle shots, manual defending, skill moves, or driven passes. EA has come up with a clever workaround to allow you to knock the ball ahead--double tap the right trigger rather than using the absent right stick--but it's a shame similar solutions haven't been found for the other missing moves. It remains a convenient way to play a quick match against friends while on the go, but you'll be fighting to get both Joy-Cons back before long.

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Unfortunately, the ability to play with friends is not reflected in FIFA 18's online offering on Switch. While you can play online--in FUT or in the standard Seasons mode or a single match--there is no way to matchmake with friends unless they happen to be in the same room as you and have their Switch on them. It's a glaring omission, and doesn't do justice to the community EA has cultivated so well on Xbox and PlayStation.

FIFA 18 on Switch delivers some enjoyable soccer when on the pitch, but without Pro Clubs and The Journey, and in restricting all access to FUT when you're not online, it shoots itself in the foot. Being able to play FIFA on the go or with a friend is gratifying, and if you're happy to just play through Career Mode for the next year, then this port will satisfy your needs and is the best mobile FIFA you can buy, but compared to the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One versions, this port is inferior in every other way.

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Source: GameSpot - Reviews (Wed, 04 Oct 2017 15:00:00 -0700)

In Forza Motorsport 7, the familiarity of driving your favorite cars on beloved tracks goes hand in hand with the joys of discovery. It's about owning sporty cars priced just out of reach in real life, whether that's a Mazda RX-8 or an Infinity Q60. There's exhilaration in taking those sweet rides down roads you've visited countless times and still finding something new around familiar bends. And whether you're preoccupied with a pack of assertive Drivatars or fiercer real-life competitors, Forza 7--much like the other installments in developer Turn 10's mainline racing series--is decidedly abundant in different ways to compete.

The first thing you'll notice about Forza 7 is that it strips away the often amusing glorification and ostentatiousness of motorsport that decorated the series' last few games. Granted, I loved the dulcet voice over of Jeremy Clarkson when he dispensed with insight and trivia on cars and courses. Forza 7 relies less on wooing you with superficial spectacles and instead lets the cars and courses speak for themselves. This break from the ceremonious aspects of motorsport is a welcome one, especially when all you want to do is race.

The career mode alone--dubbed Forza Driver's Cup--encourages you to get down to business in a wide array of competitions spread across six championship series. Since you don't need to enter all the races to win the cup, you're offered the flexibility to compete with the types of cars you're most used to. That said, the opening races effectively remind you of Forza 7's vehicle variety, encouraging you to play outside your comfort zone. You can spend a dozen hours beelining for the cup, or more than double that if you want to get first in every race. There's no clear theme to distinguish one series over another, but it's easy to go along with Turn 10's seemingly arbitrary playlists of tournaments, given the wide variety of cars and courses lining your journey.

Even after you've raised the final trophy in the Forza Driver's Cup, the quest to build a respectable collection of cars goes on. As always, the draw of browsing the hundreds of cars in Forza is the tease of purchasing a new model like the 2017 Nissan GT-R or scratching that nostalgic itch with a Pacer X from the now-defunct American Motors Corporation. And while the recent withdrawal of Lexus and Toyota production models from racing games leaves a void in this robust roster, Turn 10 helps cushion the blow with a hearty selection of Porsches, a manufacturer that was missing from the launch version of Forza 6.

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Competition takes many forms in Forza 7. The friends-as-AI Drivatars return as a pleasing alternative to age-old CPU racing behaviors like rubber banding. Online you'll find, more often than not, disorderly strangers who are as impolite as they are careless. Your best hope of winning is placing near the front of the starting grid. The alternative is, of course, participating in a private race, provided you can convince other friends and Forza players--ideally enough to fill a 24-car grid--to play fair and do their best at avoiding crashes. For the least chaotic approach to measuring and comparing greatness, Rivals presents a host of tough yet worthwhile asynchronous contests where you attempt to beat other players' lap times. Unfortunately, the traditional Forza outlets of aggression like zombie or tag are not available in the launch version of Forza 7. The same goes for Forzathon and Leagues modes, unique timed events that enhance the replay value of Forza Motorsport 6 and Forza Horizon 3.

Like many Forza Motorsports before it, Forza 7's greatest strength is its diversity of driving experiences, which says something for a series that relies mostly on circuit races, rather than adding point-to-point and off-road competition. The challenge of weaving a Mini Cooper through traffic at 45 miles per hour can be as thrilling as navigating your way through the various slopes and dips in Dubai Circuit of the Emirates. These moments are made all the more rewarding thanks to the 122 finely detailed and authentic track configurations spread across its 32 locations.

The last couple Forza Motorsports, along with Forza 7, are engrossing due to their true-to-life tracks and how surrounding environments are enhanced by changes in weather and time of day. Yet whereas Forza 6 had a premade rain condition for select tracks, Forza 7 has an impressive 16 variations of inclimate weather like thunderclouds and summer drizzle. Road Atlanta on an overcast day can exude the secluded quaintness of a course in the U.K. like the Top Gear Test Track. Suzuka--one of the oldest circuits in video games, dating back to Pole Position II--has never looked as good as when it's accentuated by the sun as it breaks through clouds during an early morning race. The ability to set multiple changing weather states in a single match further adds character to these riveting tours. The right combination of car and weather conditions can give you a newfound appreciation for a track you've raced on hundreds of times in other games.

What has always set Forza Motorsport apart from other racing sims is the depth of its newcomer-friendly accessibility options. Forza 7 continues this tradition with an array of adjustable assists and difficulty settings. Naturally, many of Forza 7's challenges arise when you've tweaked your settings just right so first place wins are hard fought. And with the return of mod cards--originally introduced in Forza Motorsport 6--you can self-impose other performance incentives for greater rewards. It's mildly gratifying to receive bonus currency for great passing or cornering even if the game didn't notice you shoved a couple cars when executing these supposedly graceful maneuvers.

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Mods are unlocked as part of Forza 7's blind card system, known as Prize Crates. These packs evenly mix practical items like cars and mods with cosmetic goods such as badges and driver outfits. When you spend most of the game encased in a car's cockpit, these detailed jumpsuits and helmets might seem like throwaway gear, but when you see your decorated driver in a convertible or the pre-race menu, envy blooms. After opening a dozen packs, I felt like I broke even, feeling elation when spending little to win a rare car, as well as heartbreak for buying the most expensive crate and ending up with only common items. While cars are now organized by loot-inspired rarity--based on their price ranges--you can still buy cars no matter the rarity without relying on the uncertainty of chance with the Prize Crates. And it should be added that having access to the Ultimate Edition gave me a VIP mod that doubled my earned XP over five races. While this perk temporarily accelerated my progression, it did not impact the quality of my overall experience.

By the time I had logged a couple dozen hours in Forza 7, the confluence of environmental and driving realism unexpectedly inspired me to recreate real-life racing events like the famous 1996 Zanardi pass at Laguna Seca. These are the kinds of experiments that Forza 7 inspires, thanks in part to the game's variety and flexibility. Even with an imperfect roster and a selection of modes that doesn't compare to the comprehensiveness of Forza 6 at launch, Forza Motorsport 7 is still a feature-rich and competition-diverse bundle of racing events that keep you coming back for more. The ability to control the weather to create rich, painterly cloudy backdrops goes a long way in making up for the lack of zombie modes and the Toyota MR2.

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Source: GameSpot - Reviews (Tue, 03 Oct 2017 19:00:00 -0700)

Curious Cameras is a visual journey through the evolution of the camera, from the earliest daguerreotype camera through to novelty toy cameras.

If you have an interest in cameras through...
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Source: ePHOTOzine - Book Reviews (Wed, 3 Feb 2016 12:47:40 GMT )

Ellen Bowness has a proven record for creating guide books to specific areas in the UK - everywhere from the Lake District, to the Yorkshire Dales and even London.

The latest installment...
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Source: ePHOTOzine - Book Reviews (Tue, 21 Mar 2017 14:57:21 GMT )
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Source: Depreview - All Reviews & Previews (Sun, 12 Feb 2017 11:00:00 Z)
This month you can win 1 of 3 Paintshop Pro 2018 software bundles in the 'Autumn' competition.
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Source: ePHOTOzine - All Photography Articles (Fri, 20 Oct 2017 08:35:32 GMT )
Learn how to capture the hustle and bustle of busy towns and cities.
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Source: ePHOTOzine - All Photography Articles (Mon, 23 Oct 2017 00:10:03 GMT )
0.5 stars out of 5: BOO-RING
It's hard out here for a ghost. Always having to think up new ways to scare suburban people in movies. You make the kids' toys come alive and play creepy music, and all the other ghosts hold up signs with straight 1.5s across the board. You're...
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Source: Movies.com - Dave White Reviews (Sat, 23 May 2015 09:29:13 GMT )
2.5 stars out of 5: You can fly. Eventually.
In your initial visit to Tomorrowland, you're not really there at all. That's what scientifically-named Casey Newton (The Longest Ride's Britt Robertson) discovers when she first goes there by touching a tiny, metal, "T"-emblazoned pin. She takes...
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Source: Movies.com - Dave White Reviews (Fri, 22 May 2015 05:11:54 GMT )
2.5 stars out of 5: Songs about butts.
Pitch Perfect 2 begins with a crazy, performance-based, wardrobe malfunction, one that, in the film's words, exposes the "down under" region of one of the a cappella Bellas. For this accidental offense they are mocked, chastised, and stripped of...
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Source: Movies.com - Dave White Reviews (Fri, 15 May 2015 05:04:29 GMT )
5.0 stars out of 5: Death to the patriarchy.
"Who killed the world?" yells a minor character in Mad Max: Fury Road. This outburst comes after an earlier moment where camera pauses on the question painted on a cave wall. And since it's one of only a couple dozen complete and comprehensible...
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Source: Movies.com - Dave White Reviews (Fri, 15 May 2015 05:05:45 GMT )
3.5 stars out of 5: Much Avenge About More Things
They're building a giant machine now, a machine made of movies. To participate in the machine's agenda of taking your money, it will not help to begin by looking at this perpetual motion installment and working backwards, trying to catch up. You...
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Source: Movies.com - Dave White Reviews (Fri, 01 May 2015 00:39:50 GMT )
1.5 stars out of 5: History written by the winners.
First-time director Russell Crowe has stepped in it, probably without meaning to. But it's happening all the same. His film, entirely devoted to an exploration of the aftermath of a key, nation-defining battle in Australian war history -- the...
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Source: Movies.com - Dave White Reviews (Fri, 24 Apr 2015 23:26:41 GMT )
2.5 stars out of 5: Proustian mush
It begins with a shot of the Earth from space, and omniscient narration. (The voice of Hugh Ross, narrator of The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford, whose low-key, somewhat conspiratorial, post-sincere, NPR reporter tone turns...
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Source: Movies.com - Dave White Reviews (Fri, 24 Apr 2015 23:25:37 GMT )
2.5 stars out of 5: A little much.
The past few years have seen a marked rise in the number of Christian-themed films getting wide theatrical distribution, but to call it a "new wave" of faith-based cinema is probably inappropriate. That designation is usually reserved for a...
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Source: Movies.com - Dave White Reviews (Fri, 24 Apr 2015 23:27:52 GMT )

After sitting out the National League Championship Series because of an injured back, Dodgers shortstop Corey Seager will take part in simulated games at Dodger Stadium this week as the final step to gauge his readiness for the World Series.

“We certainly optimistic,” manager Dave Roberts said...

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Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews ( Sat, 21 Oct 2017 18:45:00 PDT )

The Times’ NFL writer, Sam Farmer, examines this week’s matchups. Lines according to Pregame.com (O/U = over/under).

Last week’s record 7-7 (.500); season 52-39 (.571). Using point spreads with the scores Farmer predicted, the record against the spread last week would have been 7-6-1 (.538); season...

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Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sat, 21 Oct 2017 18:40:00 PDT )

Based on a hit comic book series from the late '90s, Battle Chasers: Nightwar successfully translates the look and feel of a comic into a video game. The mesmerizing animated intro shows exactly what you're in for: a wild world where steampunk meets Dungeons & Dragons, rendered in beautiful, deep-shaded colors. It's only when the turn-based RPG gets down to business that its greatest spell wears off.

The premise of Battle Chasers is that a girl named Gully has taken a pair of magic gauntlets, along with a motley crew consisting of a sellsword, a wizard, and a kindly robot, on a journey to find her missing father. The Nightwar chapter, however, is a minor sidetrack from that journey. The crew gets shot down from their airship over a mysterious island with serious problems of its own. Supposedly, the island is home to a motherlode of mana, which has prompted something of a magic-based gold rush. Mercenaries, thieves, unsavory merchants and, most worrisome of all, the attention of an evil sorceress named Destra, are drawn to the island. The crew's plans to depart dissolve into a trek that goes deep into the island's darkest regions.

Everything is captivating and breezy early on. The game's overworld is dotted with opportunities to battle oozing slimes, vicious wolf men, and surly prospectors. Dilapidated little shanty towns pop up along the way, as well as the occasional side quest, which usually impart a bit of lore before asking your band to thwart a high-ranking enemy in a dangerous place. The bread and butter of the game, however, is its major dungeons. Eight in total, the dungeons are procedurally generated, but each room and its layout is so impressively detailed, the puzzles so smoothly executed, that most of the time it's impossible to tell every dungeon wasn't meticulously laid out until you reset one, and re-enter to find an unrecognizable location.

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From the outset, combat is fairly standard turn-based fare, though every character also has a special skill to affect enemies within dungeons--pro-actively stunning, ambushing, or igniting them--just before a fight kicks off. But the big gimmick is the Overcharge system. Basic attacks contribute to a special pool of red mana points that can be used to cast magic and tech attacks, rather than actual mana points. Even as the game progresses, MP remains in short supply, so you're forced to be mindful about whether to build Overcharge or expend mana when using abilities. This gets increasingly tricky, but in a way that keeps you engaged in every battle no matter how small.

Battle Chasers endears you in the process of establishing its world, characters, and combat systems. Garrison, the mercenary, is exactly what you might expect from a square-jawed warrior with a tragic backstory: his terse personality keeps him at arm's length from his cohorts. On the flipside, the hulking mech, Calibretto, is a gentle soul who acts more as the defacto healer, and the beating heart of the story as it goes along. The cast at large brings infectious personality and energy to every scene, and all of this is underscored by a delightfully diverse soundtrack, flavoring typical medieval adventure anthems with everything from Chinese string instruments to bassy, trip-hop backbeats.

The sour notes start to hit around the third dungeon. Where just minutes prior an enemy could barely manage 100 points of damage per hit, suddenly you find multiple basic enemies hitting for 200-plus points in the same wave, leaving debuff effects like Poison and Bleeding in their wake. And then, as if to cut you some slack, you meet a dungeon boss shortly after who struggles to make a dent in your party.

But what do you do when you're overwhelmed? Logically, it's a good time to step back, grind a bit, maybe even attempt one of the bounty hunts from town. This works for a while, but proves to be an inadequate means of levelling up in the later portions of the game.

Instead, dungeons can be replayed for faster XP gains, and each features higher difficulty levels granting better rewards. But dungeons are also slow and rather sizable undertakings that (despite the procedural generation) leave you fighting the location's same enemies ad nauseum, and for the same paltry amount of XP. On PS4, it's a problem exacerbated by long load times, which between the overworld and dungeons--and occasionally before fights on the world map--can last upwards of 30 seconds, making the process of exiting a dungeon to swap characters or visit stores an eye-rolling annoyance. Thankfully, these issues didn't appear on when playing on PC.

Despite the potential for loot within dungeons, it's also disheartening to see that most pieces have strict drawbacks that are difficult to counterbalance. Armor typically raises a character's HP, stamina, and speed, but drastically lowers physical and magical defense--stats that matter against stronger enemies. Weaponry and accessories are more balanced, but typically, what drops from battles or treasure chests doesn't offer the boosts you need.

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Shops tease you with plenty of options, but buying new gear is easier said than done. Gold is a strangely rare commodity, no matter which enemies you beat or dungeons you go to. Killing an elite enemy in a dungeon set to the highest difficulty may net you a small bounty and a low level set of armor for Gully. To get the item you really want, you turn around and sell that armor for a pittance, along with a slew of other items, to try and afford good armor from the blacksmith. And quite often the armor you need is restricted to a level three or four above your own.

Hours upon hours, this little passion play repeated itself throughout my playthrough. Even after stopping everything to grind for experience, the next major area would present another drastic difficulty spike, with help nowhere to be found. Stacking debuffs on enemies was often the only effective recourse, forcing the enemy to unwittingly murdering themselves, rather than handle the task through my own attacks. While effective, it's also the least enjoyable way to experience a turn-based RPG.

Despite these issues, Battle Chasers is sustained through the strength of its story, a rollicking tale that takes our heroes literally to hell and back. It's bolstered by some sharp dialogue, gorgeous artwork, and an ensemble that plays extremely well off of each other. It's also a long game, but considering its relatively few major beats, it feels unnecessarily drawn out. It's too bad, because Battle Chasers is otherwise one of the rare comic-based games to have this many pieces in the right place.

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Source: GameSpot - Reviews (Mon, 02 Oct 2017 13:00:00 -0700)

Survival games challenge you to gain control of treacherous worlds. You typically start with very little, and need to scavenge for supplies and resources in order to craft the tools needed to help you avoid death. Success usually means having enough power to establish yourself in a higher place on the food chain, or hunkering down and building a fortified space strong enough to keep the rest of the food chain out. The Flame in the Flood doesn’t allow you to achieve either of those goals and is a consistently gripping experience as a result.

Set in a rural post-societal America, The Flame in the Flood is a procedurally-generated survival game that focuses on constant movement and improvisation. The entirety of the game’s world consists of a large, overflowing river that has engulfed the countryside, destroyed man-made infrastructure, and isolated parts of the geography, turning them into islands.

The Flame in the Flood’s audiovisual presentation is integral to establishing its strong sense of place. The art direction invokes the aesthetic of a gothic storybook. The atmospheric sound design is ever-present. The rush of the flowing river is refreshing, and the heaviness of the thunderstorms is frightening. The musical score is an excellent array of Americana, ranging from mournful blues harmonica, cheerful acoustic guitar fingerpicking, wistful mandolins, and rough alt-country vocals. Together, they give The Flame in the Flood an aura of both despair and quiet beauty.

Your protagonists are a seemingly immortal dog and a survivor whose main concerns are keeping her hunger, thirst, body temperature, exhaustion, and any major injuries under control. Because the survivor can die from neglecting any of these concerns, players must keep them at bay by either scavenging or by crafting a variety of items using resources obtained from the land. But because of the game’s narrative conceit, you’re only able to scavenge on small islands with severely limited offerings. Finding the right components to create items you need often means exploring multiple islands as you traverse the river on your makeshift raft.

Your raft can be upgraded at marinas, provided you have the right components.
Your raft can be upgraded at marinas, provided you have the right components.

There are two major constraints that make this task both interesting and difficult. The protagonist can initially carry only a dozen items in her backpack, and you’ll only be able to dock at one or two islands in a cluster of many before the current pulls you further downriver. This design is frustrating at first--the impulse to grab every item and explore every area will cause you to waste far too much time and energy rearranging your backpack and paddling against the current. But once you embrace the idea of “going with the flow” so to speak, The Flame in the Flood becomes an engaging exercise of short-term prioritization and impulsive decision-making.

Though it will take a number of failures to understand the ecosystem, learning which items are universally useful and avoiding long-term hoarding are the key to staying alive. For example, keeping uncommon fire-starting materials in order to have a method of staying warm, dry, and being able to build a safe place to sleep is more vital than hoarding food--food eventually spoils, and edible flora is common enough in certain ecosystems to snack on as you come across it. Working out your priorities and having the courage to leave valuable things behind is a stimulating challenge. The Flame in the Flood keeps you on your back foot at all times. This feels like true survival.

Unfortunately, the user interface can prove to be a source of frustration. Essential tasks, like sorting your inventory and getting a broad idea of your current crafting options feel unnecessarily taxing because of the number of steps required. All pertinent information is kept within multiple subcategories accessed from a single screen. Inventory management and crafting existing in separate subcategories, and the recipes for different kinds of craftable items are separated into subcategories under that. Finding out what components are missing for a particular tool can be tedious because of the need to flip between menus and scroll through multiple entries to reach the information. Even after hours of play, I was still wrestling with the menu system, especially when using a controller. In fact, I began switching to mouse and keyboard exclusively for menus to make navigation a little easier.

Sure. I'm cold, wet, starving, exhausted, and lacerated all over. But man, what a view.
Sure. I'm cold, wet, starving, exhausted, and lacerated all over. But man, what a view.

But switching to mouse and keyboard is not something I want to do because movement, especially piloting your raft, is far more precise and satisfying with a controller. Travelling to new locations via raft requires deft avoidance of rock formations, remnants of human infrastructure and floating debris. Lightly flowing waters regularly turn into violent rapids, which are as treacherous as they are fun to navigate--impacts are devastating on both your raft’s integrity and your own vitals. Using the last of your stamina bar to push your raft just shy of a large, jagged outcrop is consistently thrilling, and when things quiet down, gently steering your raft through the remains of drowned towns at sunset while a haunting lap-steel melody plays is a sublime experience.

The Flame in the Flood encourages you to put long-term goals aside and live in the moment, to make choices and overcome short-term problems with risky but satisfying spontaneity. Despite the awkward menu system, it’s an absorbing game that lets you experience a journey in the present, and fully appreciate the sights, sounds, and joys of floating down the river in its alluring world.

Update: The Flame In The Flood’s arrival on Nintendo Switch as a “Complete Edition” comes with the mechanical refinements and feature upgrades that have been added since the game’s initial release. These include quality-of-life tweaks to crafting, an insightful developer’s commentary, and more importantly, an alternate dog companion to choose from. While the visual fidelity noticeably lower on the Switch and there are some minor hiccups in performance that aren’t present on other platforms, The Flame In The Flood still remains a unique and absorbing survival game. We have updated the score to reflect our experience with the Switch version. - Edmond Tran, Fri. October 13, 2017, 9:00 AM AEST

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Source: GameSpot - Reviews (Thu, 12 Oct 2017 15:00:00 -0700)

Innovating within the bounds of horror's familiar tropes and rules is a difficult task, but one that The Evil Within 2 handles with grace. Developer Tango Gameworks cleverly introduces old-school horror design within the confines of a semi-open world that ultimately makes for a refreshing trip into a world of nightmares.

Picking up several years after the first game, we find the former detective Sebastian Castellanos in dire straits, still wracked with guilt over the loss of his family and haunted by his last visit into a nightmare version of reality. When a shadowy organization gives him the chance to set things right with his past and rescue his daughter from the dangerous and unstable world of Union, he willingly re-enters the haunting realm despite his residual trauma.

Right from the beginning, there's a sense of deja vu as Sebastian wanders the eerie and unreal locations in Union. Despite being one of the few survivors from the first game, he oddly finds himself falling for the same tricks and set-ups that the world and its inhabitants lay out for him. While this could be chalked up to a simple retread, much of these instances make a point of illustrating some key differences from this game and the last.

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There's generally more of an adventurous feel compared to the original's isolated levels. With more side characters to interact with--opening up moments of dialogue that flesh out the story--and optional events scattered around the world, there's a level of freedom and variety in The Evil Within 2 that was largely absent from the first game. However, there are a few notable sections where backtracking is required, which slows the pacing and sense of progression to a crawl.

Despite this, exploration is consistently enjoyable, rewarding treks to the places tucked away, where you can find details about Union's history and meet other characters looking to survive the nightmare. With so many little details that add a lot to atmosphere, there's a clear respect for The Evil Within's world. The many nods to original game feel more impactful for it, giving a renewed appreciation for Sebastian's previous adventure.

Compared to its predecessor's singular levels in unique chapters, The Evil Within 2 possesses a more organic and interconnected set of places to explore--focusing on several large maps with multiple points of interest. While there's still plenty of mind-bending and perspective-skewing set pieces, such as a tentacle creature with a large camera for an eye, the explorable spaces are the real standout. In many ways, it's like traversing through a demented amusement park filled with hideous creations, forcing yourself to face past horrors. Adventuring to places not marked on the map often yields valuable resources, and also leads to some surprising encounters with obsessive ghosts and multiple unnerving, fourth-wall breaking events.

It takes more than just going for the head to take out some of the tougher enemies.
It takes more than just going for the head to take out some of the tougher enemies.

Over time, environments descend into chaos when Union inevitably grows unstable, turning a small town into a horrifying and unnerving shell of its former self. Streets vertically upend, and fire and blood exude from places they shouldn't. The visual design of The Evil Within 2 successfully juxtaposes vastly different settings and aesthetics, and presents them in a bizarre package that illustrates the erratic and unpredictable nature of the world.

While Sebastian felt more like a mere sketch of a hardened and weary protagonist in his first outing, he feels better realized and more grounded in this sequel, giving a certain gravitas to his struggle. Showing bewilderment and confusion throughout the first game, he's more confident and determined this time, even throwing in some fitting one-liners that poke fun at some of the dangers in the last game. The supporting cast of villains also feel more active in the ongoing events, and have a greater sense of place this time around--particularly with the eccentric serial killer artist who photographs his victims upon their deaths.

The Evil Within 2 successfully juxtaposes vastly different settings and aesthetics, and presents them in a bizarre package that illustrates the erratic and unpredictable nature of the world.

While there's occasional moments of cheese and humor throughout--such as the inclusion of a goofy shooting range and collectible toys related to other Bethesda games--the levity never feels out of place, which is an accomplishment considering the game's pervasive macabre atmosphere.

Putting a greater emphasis on the survival aspect of survival horror, The Evil Within 2 demands resource management and bravery in its relatively spacious world. While common enemies are fewer in number compared to the original game, they're far more threatening alone and can easily manhandle Sebastian. There's a thoughtful approach to engagement and progression this time around, which means you'll have to think twice about whether or not to engage a group of enemies. With that said, you have a sizable arsenal of weapons and gear--including the return of the Crossbow with six different ammo types--to take on the enemies as you see fit.

Some encounters will pull out all the stops to prevent Sebastian from making progress.
Some encounters will pull out all the stops to prevent Sebastian from making progress.

Throughout his journey, Sebastian carries a communication device, allowing him to keep track of main objectives, along with points of interest and intel on the fates of side characters in the area. How you go about dealing with these characters and exploring is up to you. Similarly, whether you avoid conflict with enemies or take out as many as possible along the way is down to your preferred playstyle. The Evil Within 2 accommodates those that prefer action as much as those that like to be stealthy. Combat is robust, thanks to improved weapon handling and character upgrading that allows you to focus on the specific areas of Sebastian's skillset to enhance stealth, combat, and athleticism.

Sebastian can return to the safe haven of his mind to upgrade weapons and skills, and review case files and intel on various characters. With the Green Gel collected from fallen enemies--and the new Red Gel that unlocks upper tier upgrades--the core upgrading system has been greatly improved. Going beyond simply increasing damage of melee strikes and stamina length, new special perks can be unlocked such as the ever-useful Bottle Break skill that uses bottles as self-defense items when grabbed by enemies. Along with the expanded weapon upgrade system, using only weapon parts, the systems of progression feel far more nuanced and open.

Sebastian will have to scavenge for supplies and other materials to make up for the lack of ammo boxes and health items. While this may seem like it can make things easy, efficient crafting can only be done at dedicated workbenches, whereas crafting in the field via the radial inventory menu should be done a last resort as it costs twice as many materials. This crafting element adds a bit of a survivalist feel to The Evil Within 2, where you're scrounging around corners to find materials, all while avoiding packs of enemies looking to pummel you.

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Though the game is challenging even on its standard difficulty level, it's not unfair, and there are options for multiple playstyles. The standard Survival difficulty mode is manageable, and you won't find yourself hitting a way due to lack of resources. However, the Nightmare mode raises the stakes, featuring slightly altered combat encounters, harder enemies, and fewer resources to find. If you're up for a challenge of a different kind, the unlockable Classic mode will disable auto-saves, upgrades, and limit you to a finite amount of saves. In addition to extra unlockables for completing the tougher difficulties, the experiences they offer is more in keeping with the true survival horror experience, where resources are hard to come by, and the enemies are deadlier than before.

There's a clear respect for the horror genre in The Evil Within 2, with a number of references to classic films and games. The game channels that style and tone into combat that feels brutal and raw, stealth that has an air of suspense, and unsettling confrontations with dangerous, otherworldly creatures. The Evil Within 2 doubles down on the core of what makes survival horror games great: the focus on disempowerment and obstacles, and the ensuing satisfaction that comes with surviving a harrowing assault.

Though there's some occasional technical hiccups that result in some particularly frustrating moments and weird pacing issues, this horror sequel elevates the tense and impactful survival horror experience in ways that feel fresh and exciting. What this cerebral horror game does isn't totally new, but it rarely feels routine, and offers plenty of surprises. Coming in at a lengthy and surprisingly packed 15-hour campaign, the sequel does an admirable job of ratcheting up the tension and scares when it needs to, while also giving you the freedom to explore and proceed how you want. It's a tough thing to balance, but The Evil Within 2 does it remarkably well, and in a way that leaves a strong and lasting impression after its touching conclusion.

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Source: GameSpot - Reviews (Thu, 12 Oct 2017 19:24:00 -0700)

As a big, open-world RPG, Elex shows great ambition. The world of Magalan is a fractured yet beautiful place, having spent the last 150 years recovering from the devastating impact of a comet. It’s not your typical post-apocalyptic world, showing the signs of rejuvenation that makes exploring its heavily scarred, mountainous surface an enticing and occasionally captivating proposition. But despite this, a disjointed story, unresponsive controls, and frustrating combat mechanics consistently suck the life out of Elex, making its 30-hour campaign too arduous to recommend.

You play as Jax, a widely feared former Commander within the Alb faction, the game’s main antagonists. Albs are known for their addiction to Elex, an element that has permeated through the planet since the impact of the comet, which makes them both immensely strong and emotionally void; the perfect soldiers. Driven by their dedication to their leader, The Hybrid, and his directive to gain control of all the Elex in the world, they begin an aggressive reclamation of the planet, waging war on the other factions and building giant Converters to rip the Elex from the ground.

The Alb Directive demands the punishment of death for failing a mission, and when Jax is deemed to have failed, he is put down, albeit unsuccessfully, by another Alb commander who leaves him for dead. Having woken up some time later--a fact that is poorly communicated through the course of the intro--with his armor stolen and the residual Elex gone from his body, Jax begins his search for a new place in the world. The Alb’s savagery is a gripping premise of its own accord, but it never really lives up to the potential of its setup.

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Where Jax goes from here is entirely up to you, though you are given a little direction by way of Duras, a Berserker warrior who leads you to Goliet, the main Berserker settlement. Peaceful settlements dot Magalan, as do raider camps, mutants and other assorted creatures who have been transformed into ghastly beasts by the Elex that has ravaged the land.

You can learn unique abilities from each faction, like casting magic or suggestive mind control through dialogue, once you’ve proven your worth. The Berserkers retreat to nature, transmuting Elex into Mana for magic and using it to revitalise the scorched planet, while the religiously bound and technologically advanced Clerics utilise Elex-powered technology built upon remnants of the old-world. The lawless Outlaws live off the scrap of the desert, while all three factions live under the threat of the Albs' aggression. Appeasing their needs is no easy feat, though, largely due to the balance of difficulty in the game’s opening chapters.

Starting on the 2nd hardest of the four difficulty levels, it didn’t take me long to wind it back to normal, and then to easy. But regardless of difficulty level I felt hopelessly underpowered, even against enemies that appear early on, so much so that the only way I felt I could make significant progress was to run from as many encounters as I could. However, avoiding combat doesn’t help in the missions where you’re forced to fight.

Feeling under levelled in an RPG isn’t the problem here, rather it's that there's no real way around it. Any time I would find a newer, stronger weapon, I’d try to equip it only to be denied by my lack of certain skills. There are five main attributes you can pour your skill points into, and most weapons require you be at a minimum level with at least two of those attributes.

Upgrading weapons feels equally trivial, as doing so also affects their stat requirements and can put them well beyond your character’s capabilities, rendering it a pointless pursuit. This becomes less of a problem in the late game, but it wasn’t until around 20 hours into Elex that I felt marginally comfortable jumping into a standard, open-world encounter.

Even then, there are still some real issues with the game’s controls and combat that present themselves early; something Elex never truly recovers from. Melee combat feels cumbersome, with Jax’s quickest attack requiring a hefty wind up before the swing. The auto-targeting function doesn’t differentiate between friend or foe, and when combined with poor hit detection and slow animations, it causes all manner of problems when fighting next to groups of friendlies. Ranged combat is a little better, but similarly suffers from some problems with hit detection.

Most frustrating is when you successfully hit an enemy with either a melee or ranged attack and it does no damage whatsoever, at least until you’ve hit it three or four times. Initially I thought this had something to do with my stamina meter being drained, but that just stops you from attacking in the first place. I never did work out the precise reason why this happens, but it’s stunningly frustrating as it makes nearly every engagement feel horribly unbalanced, overshadowing Elex's better qualities.

While character models and faces leave something to be desired, much of the environmental art is incredible. Separated into distinct regions, Magalan is gorgeous. From the green, flora draped lands of Edan and the canyon laced deserts of Tavar, to the volcanic region of Ignadon, the layout of its heavily cracked and damaged surface feels superbly hand-crafted. The details can lead to occasional frame rate drops, especially with lots of characters onscreen, but it’s hard to deny Elex’s wonderful art design. The addition of a jetpack to help you traverse mountainous regions, despite feeling a little clumsy, is also a nice touch.

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Some of the inter-factional rivalries are interesting on the surface, with politics between clan leaders and in-fighting providing a bit of fun through dialogue and faction missions, but the overarching narrative rarely proves to go anywhere significant. Some of these missions touch on thought-provoking themes, like the idea that, despite being of the same faction, one person’s morality doesn’t always equate to another’s. Despite the interaction of different factions being a running theme through many of the game’s quests, Elex doesn’t have much more to say on the topic.

The main story quests aren’t quite as interesting, and are riddled with bugs in their presentation. Jax’s back story is slowly pieced together through memories presented as cutscenes during moments of exposition, though the transitions between these are jarring at best, with some cutscenes occasionally not playing at all. Numerous times did I come out of a cutscene only to find the world tearing itself apart and my character falling through the floor, either crashing the game or requiring a full restart and forcing me to replay the same section over again in the hopes that it wouldn’t fall apart.

Elex's world is no doubt enticing, but the good moments are heavily dispersed among some rough technical problems and odd designs that only serve to frustrate. The game offers an incredibly designed world and the basis of a compelling RPG that disappointingly fails to live up to its potential in almost every way. For a game that relies heavily on its combat for progression, it feels overwhelmingly geared against you, and with the added technical issues and lack of a compelling story to tell, Elex takes the wind out of its own sails at nearly every turn.

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Source: GameSpot - Reviews (Fri, 20 Oct 2017 08:00:00 -0700)

Golf Story is zany, unexpectedly funny, and mechanically sound. Those descriptors aren't overly exciting on their own, but then again, the same could be said of what constitutes contemporary RPGs; you fetch things, hit other things, and generally do the bidding of others while your heroism goes ignored. Golf Story is essentially an RPG based on mundane, real-world concerns dialed up to the nth degree, and it's that relatability that makes it much more charming than it sounds on paper.

It's a not-so-sneaky homage to titles like Mario Golf considering its central conceit: absolutely everything can be solved with a combination of golf clubs, golf balls, and dogged persistence. That's where the player-character enters--a man who's lost half his life to a soul-sucking wife and the general indifference of others--and the fun begins. This is your typical redemption story, but instead of saving the world, you're trying to simply restore order to your otherwise bleak existence in memory of your father. It's a small-scale situation, but the the stakes feel enormous.

There's no way this could go wrong, right?
There's no way this could go wrong, right?

It's immediately clear that while golf is (quite literally) the name of the game, it's not the be-all and end-all of this affair. Just like any RPG, you'll encounter towns of people who need your help, which usually gets old pretty fast. However, Sidebar Games has managed to keep the pall of boredom away by injecting some local humour into the proceedings. For those lucky enough to be putting their feet up in Australia or New Zealand as they read this, good on ya. The jokes, sly nudges, and the meat pies that are prevalent throughout Golf Story are definitely charming signifiers that people Down Under will be familiar with. While you don't necessarily need to have watched Kangaroo Jack to get a laugh out of "mate" being used as an insult, those comedic touches will mean that little bit more to those already familiar with the vernacular.

Every quest-giver is, in some timeline or other, a verifiable idiot. It feels just like helping out the usual flood of gormless peasants, but there's a lot more to it than bringing hungry villagers some cheese. Ever wanted to be a single mother's hero by hitting her son in the face with a golf ball? You're in luck. Ever wanted to command an entire legion of turtles who exist solely to help you get a hole-in-one? What about raising an army of the dead to defeat a grand wizard? Golf Story takes the traditional plausibility rulebook and throws it entirely out the window, and it's better for doing so. Golf is unlikely to be considered a high-adrenaline sport by the general public, but throwing in quests that are equal parts mid-life crisis and downright diabolical certainly gets you more mileage out of your drive.

Speaking of driving, there's a lot of it. Most golf games make you play through courses of increasing difficulty as part of your journey to being the very best, and this is no exception. You'll spend a lot of time on the golf course, doing some combination of driving, chipping, putting, and internally screaming. It'd be a lie to say that there weren't some holes that had the potential to try the very limits of human patience, but luckily, those were generally spaced out well enough to not be a deterrent. Swings work on a three-click system: pick your club, pick your power, and pick your precision level. It's a no brainer as to what the best way to play is: toggle your precision indicator until it shows the distance pay-off that you're looking for, and make sure that you hit it.

There are other factors to consider too like wind speed, slope, and roaming wildlife who will take any opportunity to get their grubby little hands on your balls. Hitting an elusive albatross (three shots under par, not the giant bird) is really only possible if you manage all the above factors successfully, but you won't be punished for muddling your way through the nine-hole courses and enjoying the scenery if that's your cup of tea. Putting seems to be an exercise in futility, since it's difficult to decipher the slope of the green, but nothing's stopping you from swapping clubs and chipping your ball straight into the hole once it's on there, so go hard or go home. If you feel like the story isn't to your liking, then Quick Play mode allows you to subject yourself to round after round of golf on your favourite course, cutting out the middleman. You can change the default conditions of various courses to make things more challenging, and the best part of it is, you can do all of this with a mate for some local friendly competition.

However, there's a lot of other things to do in Golf Story, and once you master the basics of hitting a ball, you'll be free to focus on the other things that make it so charming. The game has an arsenal of gaming and pop culture references that it relies on, and recognising each is rewarding in its own way. Without giving too much away, the fact that you're tasked with solving a supernatural murder mystery in one breath and launched into a Pacman-esque gathering quest the next would keep most on their toes. It's a credit that the pacing doesn't suffer from the inclusion of these in-jokes, often taking the form of mini-games, and if you ever get sick of playing golf, you always have these side quests and bad puns to fall back on.

There are some glitches and bugs that make their presence known every now and again, but encountering something of the game-breaking variety is rare. You may find yourself interacting with new areas and being stuck in a background music loop as the player character becomes unresponsive, or more interestingly, you could find yourself in the dark space between one room and the next, unable to leave until you path through the same doorway multiple times. However, Golf Story's little issues don't make it a write-off.

It can take a little while for the narrative to ramp up in Golf Story and for you to feel like you've really cultivated the skills of a champion, but based on the sheer scope of what the game delivers, there's likely something for everyone to enjoy whether their shtick is mini-golfing or terrorising delinquents with frisbees. It has successfully captured the trappings of yesteryear's RPGs, and the witticisms and idiosyncrasies of the characters you encounter are a great palate cleanser between rounds. Switch has had a swathe of indies hit its eShop recently, but if you're looking for something that'll give you satisfaction in terms of an interesting story and a rewarding mechanic, then Golf Story is certainly par for the course.

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Source: GameSpot - Reviews (Sat, 21 Oct 2017 12:00:00 -0700)

The Photographer's Guide To Scotland is the newest edition to Ellen Bowness' successful series, helping people to find the best photos in the UK's most photographed places.

Previous off...
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Source: ePHOTOzine - Book Reviews (Tue, 12 Apr 2016 15:53:53 GMT )
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Source: Depreview - All Reviews & Previews (Mon, 27 Mar 2017 14:00:00 Z)
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Source: Depreview - All Reviews & Previews (Wed, 01 Mar 2017 14:00:00 Z)
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Source: Depreview - All Reviews & Previews (Sun, 23 Apr 2017 10:00:00 Z)
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Source: Depreview - All Reviews & Previews (Wed, 05 Jul 2017 17:11:00 Z)
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Source: Depreview - All Reviews & Previews (Mon, 16 Oct 2017 14:52:00 Z)
Here's 6 items in your kitchen that can be used as subjects or as photographic accessories to improve your shots.
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Source: ePHOTOzine - All Photography Articles (Sun, 22 Oct 2017 00:10:04 GMT )
Don't let a bad weather forecast put you off shooting landscapes this October.
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Source: ePHOTOzine - All Photography Articles (Sat, 21 Oct 2017 00:10:03 GMT )
Eschenbach is back with more bird spotting tips and this time, we're learning about the red-crested pochard.
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Source: ePHOTOzine - Equipment Reviews (Fri, 20 Oct 2017 10:19:53 GMT )
Here are the four steps you can take if you find someone's using one of your photos without permission.
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Source: ePHOTOzine - Equipment Reviews (Fri, 20 Oct 2017 09:48:50 GMT )
Gitzo has taken over Wex Photo Video and those who visit the website can take advantage of exclusive competitions, content and offers.
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Source: ePHOTOzine - Photography News (Fri, 20 Oct 2017 08:00:01 GMT )
Gitzo has released a new Fluid Gimbal Head as well as a new collection of camera bags.
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Source: ePHOTOzine - Photography News (Fri, 20 Oct 2017 11:31:48 GMT )

An Italian model-actress met with Los Angeles police detectives for more than two hours Thursday morning, providing a detailed account of new allegations that movie mogul Harvey Weinstein sexually assaulted her at a hotel in 2013.

She is the sixth woman to accuse Weinstein of rape or forcible sex...

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Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews ( Thu, 19 Oct 2017 20:07:00 PDT )
SERIES

Crazy Ex-Girlfriend Paula (Donna Lynne Champlin) tries to help get revenge against Josh (Vincent Rodriguez III), while Rebecca (Rachel Bloom) also seeks Nathaniel’s (Scott Michael Foster) help. Pete Gardner, David Hull, Vella Lovell and Gabrielle Ruiz also star. 8 p.m. KTLA

Once Upon a Time...

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Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Thu, 19 Oct 2017 20:00:00 PDT )
1.0 stars out of 5: Pursue a ticket to a different movie.
Allow me to mangle Tolstoy for a minute, and say that each good comedy is good in its own way, but that all bad comedies are alike. There's variation, of course, but they all limp along on sad, weak legs and confused direction. They're airless...
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Source: Movies.com - Dave White Reviews (Fri, 08 May 2015 21:06:08 GMT )
1.0 stars out of 5: Stay home.
Although there is at least one earlier, less sexual, usage of the slang term "the d-train," referring to having a generalized bad experience, lately the expression has become more synonymous with the penis. That's because pop culture always needs...
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Source: Movies.com - Dave White Reviews (Sat, 09 May 2015 01:33:01 GMT )

For its first half, the biopic “Tom of Finland” proves an immersive, handsomely crafted look at how famed gay Finnish illustrator Touko Laaksonen (Pekka Strang) came to create his fetishistic drawings of hyper-masculine, leather-clad men that would become a gay porn staple and eventually fill coffee...

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Source: Los Angeles Times - Movie Reviews (Thu, 19 Oct 2017 10:20:00 PDT )
On day two of UCLA's annual JazzReggae Festival, Shaggy, Tarrus Riley, Collie Buddz, Alison Hinds and others showcased the many sounds of the Caribbean, from soca and reggae to reggaeton and lovers rock. Times pop music critic Randall Roberts offers an overview of the day. Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Pop Concert Reviews ( Tue, 29 May 2012 12:25:57 -0700 )
The New Zealand band the Clean has been around a long time but still packs energy, especially when it performs ‘Tally Ho.’ Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Pop Concert Reviews ( Thu, 31 May 2012 14:57:42 -0700 )
LMFAO's Redfoo and Sky Blu stay in character and play debauchery for laughs and fun at Staples Center as part of Sorry for Party Rocking Tour. Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Pop Concert Reviews ( Wed, 06 Jun 2012 18:34:01 -0700 )
The Beach Boys reunited June 2, 2012, at the Hollywood Bowl for the band's first tour together in more than two decades. A review for the Los Angeles Times. Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Pop Concert Reviews ( Sun, 03 Jun 2012 13:21:26 -0700 )
If you closed your eyes during the sold-out Santigold concert at Club Nokia Friday night -- especially at any point in the first half -- it’d have been easy to feel like you were at one of the Hollywood Bowl’s annual flashback concerts featuring ‘80s British bands. Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Pop Concert Reviews ( Sat, 02 Jun 2012 13:49:57 -0700 )
Van Halen returned to Los Angeles to perform to a hometown crowd at the Staples Center, where band members David Lee Roth, and Eddie, Alex, and Wolfgang Van Halen performed during their "Different Kind of Truth" reunion tour. Times pop music critic Randall Roberts says the performance was often lackluster. Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Pop Concert Reviews ( Sat, 02 Jun 2012 12:49:42 -0700 )
Nickelback has no official connection to the big-screen version of “Rock of Ages,” but on Friday night at Staples Center, it was hard not to think of the just-opened movie musical -- a flashy-trashy dramatization of the 1980s hard-rock scene... Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Pop Concert Reviews ( Sun, 17 Jun 2012 19:36:33 -0700 )
Now in its fifth year, Make Music Pasadena celebrates music at its most casual and community-focused, and has grown from a festival that once largely featured intimate, acoustic appearances in storefronts to one that can draw artists with national appeal. Boasting 149 performances and pop-up stages on Old Town's Colorado Boulevard and the Playhouse District's Madison Avenue, Make Music Pasadena is a large-scale event done on a budget. Ninety-nine percent of the artists appearing do not get paid, say organizers, and headliners such as electronic artist Grimes and peppy local rockers Grouplove were expected to bring at least 20,000 people to downtown Pasadena. Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Pop Concert Reviews ( Sun, 17 Jun 2012 17:39:47 -0700 )
Live: Lil Kim driven to give till it hurts: The hip-hop diva's ambitious if erratic show was almost too much for the compact confines of Key Club. Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Pop Concert Reviews ( Thu, 14 Jun 2012 17:51:14 -0700 )
Power 106 FM kept its annual summer hip-hop show, Powerhouse, old school and relatively orthodox, with rappers Snoop Dogg, T.I. and Young Jeezy leading a show that was light on the dance-oriented pop hits that dominate the airwaves. The Times' August Brown reviews. Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Pop Concert Reviews (Sun, 24 Jun 2012 17:40:41 -0700 )

Naoko Yamada’s “A Silent Voice: The Movie,” which won the 2017 Japanese Movie Critics Award for Best Animation, presents an unflinching depiction of the cruelty children inflict on each other.

Shoya Ishida (voiced by Miyu Irino) is the most obnoxious boy in his sixth-grade class: He goofs off,...

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Source: Los Angeles Times - Movie Reviews (Thu, 19 Oct 2017 10:35:00 PDT )

Artful and atmospheric to the max, “Never Here” is a study in personality disintegration dressed up as a whodunit. The film marks an auspicious debut for writer-director Camille Thoman and a fitting valedictory for the late, great Sam Shepard, whose final screen performance exemplifies his offhand...

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Source: Los Angeles Times - Movie Reviews (Thu, 19 Oct 2017 10:50:00 PDT )

Fire Emblem Warriors brings heroes from the revered Fire Emblem strategy series and drops them onto the chaotic battlefields developer Omega Force's Warriors games are known for. These knights, paladins, and mages are a natural fit for medieval clashes against swarms of hapless enemies, but their influence on the Warriors formula is otherwise fleeting. However fun it can be in short spurts, Fire Emblem Warriors feels like plenty of other Warriors games before it: a simple joy plagued by repetitive and shallow encounters.

Like more recent Fire Emblem games, you're introduced to a new pair of protagonists--Lianna and Rowan. Sibling heirs to the Aytolis Kingdom, their land comes under threat with the appearance of an evil dragon and thousands of otherworldly fiends who've slipped through a rift in space and time. In a similar fashion, characters from various Fire Emblem timelines (The Blazing Blade, Shadow Dragon, Awakening, Fates, and Echoes) come to Lianna and Rowan's rescue. It's a thin narrative that leads to plenty of awkward exchanges and cliche events. And though this may be par for the course for the Warriors series, Fire Emblem games are typically heralded for their captivating stories and deep characters, so it's hard not to be a little disappointed to see very little of that transition over to this experimental outing.

If you’re at all familiar with the Warriors games, then you already know what to expect as Fire Emblem Warriors follows the formula very closely: Playing as one of the many available heroes, you venture onto the battlefield and slay hundreds, if not thousands, of enemies during a single mission through hard-hitting yet simple-to-execute combo attacks.

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Attacks and combos are input via a two-button system for light and heavy attacks, and you have access to a flashy special ability once your damage meter is full. The weapon triangle system pulled from Fire Emblem dictates how effective one character is against another depending on their default weapon, but weighing the advantages of individual face-offs slows the rapid and enjoyable pace of combat. Likewise, the pair up system, where you do your best to create a bond between two characters, doesn't make this game significantly different from other Warriors spin-offs.

Apart from feeling somewhat shallow, Fire Emblem Warriors plays smoothly, and it’s enjoyable to watch favorites like Chrom, Marth, and Lyndis break free from their turn-based ways to slay massive swarms of low-level enemies in real time. Sadly, not every beloved Fire Emblem character made the cut, with notable protagonists like Alm, Eliwood, Ike, and Roy missing in action.

Given the potential impact Fire Emblem's demanding nature could have had on the Warriors series' straightforward hack-and-slash engagements, the diminished classic mode is another source of disappointment.

In keeping with Fire Emblem tradition, you have the option between “casual” and “classic” game modes, though the rules work differently, eschewing classic permadeath for something a little less punishing. During a casual playthrough, fallen allies are easily revived at certain checkpoints; however, they can also be revived on the classic difficulty provided you have enough gold and other relevant items. In other words, no character is ever truly dead. It's also rare that you ever need to worry in the first place, as you’re free to switch between any one of the up to four characters you can take on a mission, allowing you to quickly control and heal allies that may be on the verge of death. Given the potential impact Fire Emblem's demanding nature could have had on the Warriors series' straightforward hack-and-slash engagements, the diminished classic mode is another source of disappointment.

The same can be said for your AI partners, who are nearly incapable of autonomy, even when given a direct purpose such as attacking or defending a chosen person or location. They rarely take the most efficient route following your order, and often end up simply standing in place once they reach their destination. With such unreliable partners, you're ultimately left to do everything yourself as missions unfold.

And because Fire Emblem Warriors is a Warriors game, there are hundreds of enemies on-screen at once. The frame rate takes a notable hit from time to time, almost chugging as the game attempts to render both the enemies you've defeated and their replacements spawning into battle. The same issue occurs when characters are introduced during missions in short, voiced cutscenes, causing the game to throttle down to stop-motion like speeds. These performance issues don’t hinder your ability to succeed, but they are obtrusive enough to be annoying.

Fire Emblem Warriors doesn’t radically change the formula of the two-decade-old Warriors franchise, nor is it concerned with attempting to do so. At best, it's a decent vehicle for Fire Emblem's characters, a chance to flex their muscles in a new venue without the limitations of turn-based combat holding their abilities back. There are signs of potential left unrealized, and the thought of what a Warriors game with truly dramatic character relationships and permadeath could have been lingers. For now that remains out of reach as Fire Emblem Warriors is yet another collaboration where Omega Force's tendencies dominate the finished product.

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Source: GameSpot - Reviews (Wed, 18 Oct 2017 06:00:00 -0700)

Spectacle and showmanship are as vital to professional wrestling as its storylines and in-ring action. Fans will fondly remember a Superstar's distinctive mannerisms, or the pageantry of a glorious entrance, just as much as a five-star match. WWE 2K18 takes this aspect to heart with a substantial leap in visual fidelity--further complementing developers Yuke's and Visual Concepts' adherence to wrestling authenticity. However, the game's cosmetic advancements fail to cover up stagnant gameplay mired in technical issues.

WWE's superlative lighting, character models, and motion captured animations bring each star of the squared circle to life with startling accuracy. And while there are some disparities between the poor saps at the bottom of the card and those at the very top, the gap isn't as significant as it has been in previous years, with entrances remaining a dazzling highlight. Small details, like stretch marks and surgery scars, also contribute to WWE 2K18's graphical showcase. Muscles are defined and flex when a Superstar heaves an opponent over their shoulders, veins bulge under the strain of submissions, and even Finn Balor's demon paint gradually peels off over the course of a match. As a visual representation of the product we see on TV each week, it's definitely impressive, and this devotion to realism extends to the gameplay, too. This is nothing new, of course, and if you haven't enjoyed the series' methodical pacing and restrictive over-reliance on counters in the past, WWE 2K18 is unlikely to change your mind. This is essentially the same game as it was last year, with a few incremental additions edging the needle closer to the authenticity the series strives for.

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Hot tags have been modified to be a more natural, momentum-injecting part of tag team matches, and a new carry system gives you more options on offence, allowing you to forcefully haul your opponent around the arena and execute a variety of context-sensitive actions with ease. This is particularly enjoyable if you're playing as a giant like Braun Strowman, since you can hoist smaller opponents over your head and launch them directly out of the ring--which is certainly impactful in Battle Royales and the Royal Rumble. Speaking of which, eight-person matches are also new this year, adding an element of chaos to any over-the-top-rope shenanigans. The only downside is that so many Superstars duking it out at the same time has a negative impact on the game's frame rate, with the slowdown enough to disrupt your timing on counters.

This isn't WWE 2K18's only technical issue either. While the AI is passable at best and dim-witted at worst, there are also myriad glitches spread throughout its various match types and game modes. From Superstars getting trapped inside inanimate objects and being teleported around the arena; referees not counting pins in eight-person tag matches; the Royal Rumble completely breaking due to Superstars failing to appear when their number is called; or the way the Elimination Chamber acts as a proverbial cooking pot for a concoction of ludicrous glitches, WWE 2K18 is a messy experience. Sure, a number of these mishaps are funny, but there are others that actively ruin the experience on a larger scale, whether it's the game crashing every single time there's a promo in Universe mode, or the way MyCareer struggles to keep track of your allies and rivals, even forcing you to wrestle yourself in championship title matches. This series has always suffered from its fair share of glitches, but they're especially egregious and plentiful this year.

Meanwhile, MyCareer still tasks you with creating a character and climbing the ranks of the WWE, however, there's still no option to create anything but a male wrestler, which is disheartening. Some light RPG elements do at least attempt to spruce up the action in-between matches, and you're now free to explore the backstage areas, chatting to your fellow Superstars and picking up side quests that will further your alignment as either a face or heel, unlocking specific perks for each. The aforementioned glitches create problems here, however, as you might be asked to cut a promo on Enzo Amore, only to call out Cesaro instead, and then be told backstage that Dean Ambrose knew your plan. It's a mess, and a struggle to keep track of. These backstage segments are overly lethargic due to the regularity and length of their loading times, which mean you'll often spend more time watching the game than playing it.

This series has always suffered from its fair share of glitches, but they're especially egregious and plentiful this year.

Beyond these issues, the writing in MyCareer remains its biggest problem. Even if you excuse the juvenile insults and complete lack of voice acting, there's nothing here that carries any weight or interest. The writing lacks character and individuality, so it doesn't matter who you speak to backstage. Bray Wyatt might be an occultist hillbilly with an anomalous promo style, but he'll still speak with the same verbiage as Seth Rollins, who will in turn sound just like John Cena. And this carries over into the promos, too. These work much the same as they did last year, tasking you with picking from a number of dialogue options, and then trying to maintain a cohesive tone throughout to achieve a high score. The dialogue options aren't quite as vague as they were before, so it's easier to craft a coherent promo, but the terrible writing and silent pantomiming rob these moments of any impact. Last year, the promo system felt like a flawed first draft with room to grow, but there's been very little progression one year later.

MyCareer's online counterpart, Road to Glory, fares much better than its single-player brethren. By following the real-life WWE calendar, it allows you to take your created character online to compete against others in daily match types in order to earn enough stars to qualify for pay-per-view events. This adds some purpose and impetus to online brawls, and the netcode this year is surprisingly good, with smooth matches and no noticeable input delay, even when you bump it up to a fatal-fourway.

It's fun seeing everybody else's created Superstars, but customisation in MyCareer is disappointingly limited by the inclusion of loot boxes. There are no microtransactions in WWE 2K18, so 2K isn't trying to urge you to part with more cash. But, honestly, that just makes this approach all the more baffling. The vast majority of customisation options, from hairstyles and T-shirts, to wrestling tights and even the vast repertoire of moves, are locked behind these loot boxes. You earn virtual currency throughout the game, and Road to Glory also has weekly loot boxes to unlock, but you're still at the whim of a randomised draw. If you want a specific beard or a finishing move, you're just going to have to hope luck falls on your side.

Fortunately, the creation suite outside of MyCareer is as exhaustive as ever, with everything unlocked from the get-go. You can tinker with every single facet of a Superstar's design and create new title belts, custom matches, and arenas, and download other users' creations to, say, fill out the NXT roster with the likes of Adam Cole, Drew Galloway, and Kairi Sane.

WWE 2K18's in-ring combat is fundamentally flawed, and will be as divisive as it often is. Yet there's no denying the inherent joy derived from performing your favorite Superstar's signature moves. Whether it's cracking your opponent over the head with AJ Styles' Phenomenal Forearm, or pounding the life out of Asuka's latest victim, there are moments of pure pro wrestling enjoyment to be found here. It's just compounded by too many frustrating issues, disruptive glitches, and a dearth of engaging single-player modes. This series has remained stagnant for far too long, and WWE 2K18 doesn't change things.

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Source: GameSpot - Reviews (Thu, 19 Oct 2017 08:22:00 -0700)
Zeiss has announced a new wide-angle prime lens, the Zeiss Milvus 25mm f/1.4 Distagon T* lens for Nikon and Canon.
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Source: ePHOTOzine - Photography News (Wed, 18 Oct 2017 10:15:12 GMT )
Leica has announced the re-release of a classic Leica portrait lens, the Thambar-M 90mm f/2.2 telephoto prime lens.
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Source: ePHOTOzine - Photography News (Wed, 18 Oct 2017 11:41:38 GMT )
The Somerset Levels are a unique landscape of marshlands, rivers, rhines and farmland re-claimed from flooded salt marsh. The Yeo flows right through it and has a footpath for almost all its length, ...
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Source: ePHOTOzine - Photo locations (2017-10-20 04:10:01)
Burrow Mump is a striking, yet diminutive, hill standing proud above the Somerset Levels. Sometimes confused with the much larger Glastonbury Tor this 80ft high hillock is topped with the dramatic rui...
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Source: ePHOTOzine - Photo locations (2017-10-20 04:10:01)
Melton country park has woodland walks, a weir where there are always ducks and swans gathering, a large lake with many different species of birds. There are also some Muntjac deer around however I ha...
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Source: ePHOTOzine - Photo locations (2017-10-20 04:10:01)
Lightroom has had an update and with it comes a new mask, speed issue fixes and more integration with the cloud.
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Source: ePHOTOzine - Photography News (Wed, 18 Oct 2017 14:00:13 GMT )
Yorkshire Water Reservoir (North East of Wakefield). Free car park just off Haigh Moor Road and easy access round the reservoir....
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Source: ePHOTOzine - Photo locations (2017-10-20 04:10:01)
Sandal Castle stands in a commanding position overlooking the River Calder, to the south of Wakefield city centre. The castle is best known for the role it played in the Battle of Wakefield in 1460 du...
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Source: ePHOTOzine - Photo locations (2017-10-20 04:10:01)
Our obsession with the Nurburgring is continuing today with even more trackside shots.
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Source: ePHOTOzine - Equipment Reviews (Wed, 18 Oct 2017 08:00:07 GMT )

Bernhard Edmaier is a photographer who also happens to have training as a geologist and he uses his knowledge to create stunning images of earth, from the sky as well as on land, that educat...
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Source: ePHOTOzine - Book Reviews (Wed, 2 Sep 2015 14:24:09 GMT )

Learning To See Creatively is all about learning to see design, colour and composition in photography.

Author Bryan Peterson wants you to learn how to 'see' properly, paying more attentio...
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Source: ePHOTOzine - Book Reviews (Mon, 9 Nov 2015 15:48:38 GMT )

Photographing North Wales is a photo location guidebook by Simon Kitchin.

Simon is a seasoned landscape photographer and here he shares with us his passion for North Wales and all his fav...
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Source: ePHOTOzine - Book Reviews (Wed, 2 Dec 2015 11:32:56 GMT )

Abandoned on the Plains: Fragments of the American Dream is a very interesting book that leaves you asking lots of questions.

Basically, the book documents one couple's tour of central A...
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Source: ePHOTOzine - Book Reviews (Thu, 11 Feb 2016 10:22:27 GMT )

A new book, edited by Clive Woodyear, aims to provide inspiration for photographers. Within the book experienced and successful photographers talk about how and why they created their images...
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Source: ePHOTOzine - Book Reviews (Thu, 11 Feb 2016 16:32:22 GMT )

A Show Of Hands is a book full of images of people's hands.

You might immediately think that this an odd port of the body to take images with. Usually we go for someone's face, or use th...
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Source: ePHOTOzine - Book Reviews (Wed, 23 Sep 2015 11:13:42 GMT )


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