Headlines from arround the world


CATEGORIES
Big News Network Big News Network
Big News Network - Business Big News Network - Business
Big News Network - Cities Big News Network - Cities
Big News Network - Countries Big News Network - Countries
Big News Network - Regions Big News Network - Regions
Big News Network - US States Big News Network - US States
BBC News BBC News
CNN CNN
Economy Economy
Europe Europe
Food & Nutrition Food & Nutrition
Health & Health Care Health & Health Care
Lifestyle Lifestyle
Mail Online Mail Online
Motoring Motoring
Other News Sources Other News Sources
Photography Photography
Science & Technology Science & Technology
Sports Sports
Sport - American Football Sport - American Football
Sport - Athletics Sport - Athletics
Sport - Baseball Sport - Baseball
Sport - Basketball Sport - Basketball
Sport - Car Racing Sport - Car Racing
Sport - Cricket Sport - Cricket
Sport - Football Sport - Football
Sport - Golf Sport - Golf
Sport - Hockey Sport - Hockey
Sport - Ice Hockey Sport - Ice Hockey
Sport - Sailing Sport - Sailing
Sport - Soccer Sport - Soccer
Sport - Rugby Sport - Rugby
Sport - Tennis Sport - Tennis
Reuters Reuters
The Adelaide Now The Adelaide Now
The Australian The Australian
The Daily Express The Daily Express
The Daily Telegraph The Daily Telegraph
The Guardian The Guardian
The Gazette The Gazette
The Herald Sun The Herald Sun
The Herald Sun Melbourne The Herald Sun Melbourne
The Independent The Independent
The Jerusalem Post The Jerusalem Post
The Jordan Times The Jordan Times
The Korea Herald The Korea Herald
The New York Times The New York Times
The New Zealand Herald The New Zealand Herald
The Perthnow The Perthnow
The Pravda The Pravda
The Sydney Morning Herald The Sydney Morning Herald
The Telegraph The Telegraph
The Times of India The Times of India
The Toronto Star The Toronto Star
The Wall Street Journal The Wall Street Journal
The Washington Post The Washington Post
Travel Travel
Typically Spanish Typically Spanish
USA TODAY USA TODAY
Yahoo World News Yahoo World News
CONTENT
FEATURED NEWS FEEDS


NEWS (LAST 200)
Auckland: New Zealands city of 50 volcan...
Trumps travel ban: What the new Supreme ...
Summer holidays: Longest delays from UK ...
Twisted killer cabbies secret murder tro...
Senate health care bill gives $250,000 g...
Newspaper headlines: DUP deal dominates ...
Brazils top prosecutor charges President...
Revolting prison wedding has gone ahead ...
Australian woman arrested with swastika ...
Modis Trump card: Indian prime minister ...
Facebook booze buyer supplied underage g...
Supreme Court order may cause travel cha...
CBO: Senate GOP healthcare bill would le...
Travel ban returns: What happens now, an...
Prime Minister Bill English backs Govern...
Woman charged with murder after 55-year-...
Remains of kidnapped journalist found...
Photos of alleged strippers at South Afr...
Plumbing company with no fix no fee guar...
Emmett Till marker near grocery store si...
Low-wage EU migrants ‘to be told they ...
Prison inmate, 29, ‘had lesbian tryst ...
5 Ways J.K Rowling Considered Changing ...
Death toll in sinking of Colombian touri...
What its really like to be a social medi...
Trump misses ISIS news conference deadli...
Reality Check: Britain and EU at odds ov...
How I Got the Shot: To Photograph a Gal...
Seven West Media appoints WA CEO
Cyclists in Victoria to be fined $476 te...
In Trinity church ruling, Supreme Court ...
Brexit: More than one million foreign wo...
We worry about our own safety, SIS neigh...
From Tawa to Taunton: Melie Kerr taking ...
Ireland to LEAVE the EU? DUP MP urges Br...
Airline vet to lead Amtrak in a summer o...
I had to crowdfund for my wheelchair so ...
Mothers an unseen force in honour abuse...
Wrecked McLaren supercar sold in online ...
FIFA: Video assistant referee system nee...
Trump celebrates a watered-down victory ...
Leslie Jones claims Ritz-Carlton doesn...
Oakland councilman announces run for Eas...
Why do my DIY blood pressure readings ke...
Senate health care bill in jeopardy afte...
DWTS host Erin Andrews weds former NHL p...
Falling chunks of concrete are destroyin...
Perths southeast fastest growing region ...
Philando Castiles family reaches $3M set...
Soldier on Soldier Attacks Fast Facts...
Brazils top prosecutor charges Temer wit...
Brazils top prosecutor charges Temer wit...
‘Fat-fingered trader’ sends price of...
Nuclear power station’s intern bikini ...
Most wanted man was living just metres f...
Familys fury as fake claims over arrest ...
FIFA leak hits Qatars 2022 World Cup bid...
Serena Williams has no interest in John ...
Mitch Landrieu: Mayors must ‘fight to...
Angelina Jolie urges children to fight f...
CRAIG BROWNS Ten facts about politicians...
UKs May faces backlash after DUP deal...
Michael McCarthy convicted of murder in ...
Serena Williams hits back at John McEnro...
Ivanka Trump, adviser to US president, s...
Sebastian Vettel crash like a massive he...
Perth basketball player pulled a gun on ...
Queen and royals good value for money at...
Senator Puts Hold on Arms Sales to Persi...
FBI interviewed ex-Trump adviser Carter ...
Colombia's Farc rebels have handed ...
Number of mental health patients treated...
Missing canoe owner thought he had been ...
Chimps arent super strong compared to hu...
Pro-Trump PAC threatens GOP senator with...
Steven Yeun: Why Netflixs super-pig Okja...
Americas Cup: Behind the scenes of Team ...
Anthem settles a security breach lawsuit...
Rangers star Barrie McKays Ibrox future ...
I crowdfunded my wheelchair
Regular brisk walks at work reduce risk ...
Aveo retirement village accused high fee...
Navys stunning new flagship HMS Queen El...
NASA says it hasnt found aliens after cl...
No bond for suspect in N. Carolina teens...
Is Russias US ambassador stepping down? ...
Antarctica is melting and scientists are...
Uber driver confesses to slitting cousin...
Head of doctors union claims crisis caus...
The Latest: New Georgia, South Carolina ...
Vietnamese man found dead in Deer Park M...
Ex-Trump aide named head of HUD for New ...
Australia Post appoints Christine Holgat...
Public servants charge taxpayers $1.5 mi...
Crowd catches girl after ride fall...
Former Calgary Public Library chief and ...
Census 2016: Milestone passed as Austral...
Callum McGregor reveals anguish at Scotl...
Cyber attack fears against Britains newe...
Vintage Disneyland concept map sells at ...
Jose Mourinho arrives in Portugal ahead ...
3 journalists leave CNN after retracted ...
Police reopen Barclay investigation...
Team New Zealand set to tighten national...
Opinion: The Southwest is broiling. Are ...
A mothers love?
DC mural repainted -- without Cosby...
Cyclist dodges cars in determined dog re...
The great childbirth taboo: New mothers ...
Man spent 6 months in Rikers because no ...
Blackmores loses CEO Holgate with regret...
Kate Beckinsale wraps arms around Matt R...
Police: Man allegedly used his prostheti...
Donald Trump is on track to break his pr...
Serena Williams wants to have a baby, no...
Brazils Michel Temer charged with corrup...
Trump appointee Gorsuch takes far right ...
Ivanka Trump has a lot to learn
18 emaciated horses rescued from farm...
Trump urges Indias Modi to fix deficit, ...
Supreme Court allows parts of Trump trav...
Council approves final alignment and sta...
How much do you know about the ATM?...
Three CNN Journalists Resign After Retra...
Wimbledon 2017: Novak Djokovic dealt blo...
D-backs player hits HR into pool of Phil...
Democrats: CBO Reveals 5 Bad Things in G...
Climate change may mean fewer hailstorms...
A trichologists guide to healthier hair...
Analysis: CBO report predicts more unins...
Markets Live: All talk, no action
Brazil’s attorney general accuses Pres...
Eaux Claires recap: the best and worst o...
Veljko Paunovic previews trip to FC Cinc...
LG65E6P 3D 4K OLED HIGH END TV 2016 MODE...
St Moritz Grace Hotel apartments open to...
Cash lives on after 50 years of ATMs...
I900d color printer canon (East Harlem) ...
Steve Torrence takes No. 1 qualifier at ...
Best of the 2017 Major League Soccer sea...
Reports: Beyoncé, Jay Z welcome their t...
Mike Holmes: Building a home that best s...
Panasonic PV-GS2 Mini DV Movie Camcorder...
For once, Trump is right about Obama...
Can Serena return to the top of tennis a...
The teen with the future of US soccer on...
Headed to Great Falls, or even Great Bri...
Cost of home loans tumbles to record low...
Read an excerpt from Sue Graftons new Y ...
Making religious arbitration work in Ame...
ROI: Premier Leagues best-value signings...
Sony Home Theatre Sound Bar with Wireles...
The Mummy review by Brian Viner
Leaseholds on new-build homes set to be ...
40" Black Sony Bravia LCD KDL‑S5100 S-...
Exclusive: 4 days with Tiger Woods...
Former prison converted into £500,000 h...
Kerber: The gym has changed my tennis...
12" Kicker sub with amp $500...
Matchday Live breaks down San Joses unex...
Happy birthday, Canada! The U.S. neighbo...
Show stoppers: Alan Titchmarsh on growin...
Loews Hotels to open flagship property i...
Property prices of mobile homes reach £...
How the Republicans’ health-care plan ...
LG65EP6 3D 4K OLED HIGH END TV 2016 MODE...
Plentific homeowners include Lego into i...
37 Phoenix, Scottsdale summer resort dea...
Kerber on US Open triumph
Double Your Galaxy S8 or S8+s Battery Li...
Richard Geres Norman conquest is perfect...
Summer brings sizzling deals at Phoenix ...
Hugh Laurie wanted to star in The Night ...
Part-time agents can be paid £20 per vi...
33 beautiful reasons to visit Italy...
What parents should know about the VR ge...
NEW IN THE BOX PYLE PPA200 AMP, (STATEN ...
Paul Ince warns England fans not to labe...
Teen girls prepare for space launch...
Wilson is an engaging dark comedy, says ...
TV : Insignia - 40" LED/HDTV (Greenwich ...
UNC basketball star Luke Maye flips car,...
Brother 5370DW Wireless Printer (DUMBO) ...
Wawrinka wins third slam title
F1: Hamiltons sexy lap equals Senna reco...
Find a great hotel deal? Check that reso...
Panasonic Plasma TCP54G10 (Suffern) �...
Senate And House Take Different Plans To...
Is the GOP trying to repeal and replace ...
Hotels add plugs, ports for device-laden...
The seal of biliteracy is a distinction ...
The Supreme Court splits the baby on Tru...
YouTube queen Zoellas chest of drawers r...
Captain America Chris Evans bond with yo...
The one-bed flat in a London block for s...
Golden State-Cavaliers rematch is no sur...
Humans reach for godhood — and leave t...
Take That the musical takes £10m 3 mont...
Have you ever wondered what hormones do?...
Want to know the worst thing about the G...

REVIEWS & PREVIEWS (LAST 60)
2017 Roundup: Enthusiast Long Zoom Camer...
The Fidelio Incident Review
Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II Review
OnePlus 3T Review
Canon EOS M5 Review
Hasselblad X1D-50c shooting experience...
Reservoir Dogs: Bloody Days Review...
Canon EF 16-35mm F2.8L III USM Review...
How To Shoot Portraits At Living Museums...
Sigma sd Quattro H Review
Guy Ritchies King Arthur: Legend of the ...
Stéphane Brizés 19th century drama A W...
The Wall, a cat-and-mouse game between U...
The details are messy in nonsensical rev...
Diane Lane stops to sip the rosé in Ele...
Get Me Roger Stone traces GOP strategist...
Improbable friends hit the road in delig...
The serial killer-thriller ‘Hounds of ...
Folk Hero & Funny Guy: A road trip movie...
Today in Entertainment: Netflix cancels ...
Supreme Court revives Trumps foreign tra...
How To Turn Real Life Into A Toy Model S...
Third June Photo Month Winner Revealed...
Stunning Swallowtail Butterfly Image Awa...
Fiction: From City to Jungle, a New Nove...
Nonfiction: Why America’s Great Cities...
This years BET Awards took a dip in ener...
Gun violence is Americas shame
Rare condition sends Dodgers Franklin Gu...
Overwatch: Junkrats RIP-Tire Made IRL Wi...
Arroyo Seco Weekend highlights the power...
The Walking Dead: A New Frontier - Episo...
The Town Of Light Review
Canon EF 35mm F1.4L II USM Review
2017 Roundup: Interchangeable Lens Camer...
Guardians Of The Galaxy - Episode 2: Und...
2017 Roundup: Compact Enthusiast Zoom Ca...
Sigma 12-24mm F4 DG HSM Art Review...
Nikon D5600 Review
Canon EOS Rebel T7i / EOS 800D / Kiss X9...
How To Improve Your Travel Photography P...
The week ahead in L.A. classical music, ...
Study the colors and conflict that made ...
Movie openings: June 28-30
French Polynesia, Cuba travel and a beac...
Goodbye, Columbus
The indoctrination of a young girl...
Mexican soccer fans are reluctant to giv...
Brad Sherman, an L.A.-area congressman, ...
Political Road Map: Californias big chan...
Sporting Kansas City tops Galaxy 2-1...
DJ Khaled brings sloppy but endearing sh...
In a day of summer football, L.A. Cathed...
Aaron Pico vs. Zach Freeman live round-b...
Kings select Jaret Anderson-Dolan with 4...
Yemen to probe alleged torture of detain...
James Gallagher vs. Chinzo Machida live ...
Koch brothers political network says Sen...
5 Ways To Improve Your Coastal Photograp...
Pentax KP Review


Quentin Tarantino made a name for himself back in the early 1990s with the release of Reservoir Dogs, but the recently released Reservoir Dogs: Bloody Days doesn't come close to reaching the same heights. It amounts to nothing more than a predictable twin-stick shooter that fails to live up to its own potential, let alone the film's, in any appreciable way.

There's no narrative to Bloody Days--no character development to create emotional resonance. The game at large isn't concerned with variety, either, sticking to the same rigid format from start to finish. You take control of reimagined versions of the film's six leads--Mr. Blonde, Mr. Blue, Mr. Brown, Mr. Pink, Mr. Orange, and Mr. White--and head out on 18 heists. Each mission starts the same: There's some banter between the two primary characters (you have the option of selecting a third), they walk to a marked position, guns are pulled, and bullets fly as you attempt to shoot your way to a bounty of cash. Aside from differing locations, such as a bank, laundromat, or warehouse, all 18 levels follow this very strict, predictable formula. It doesn't take long for Bloody Days to fall into repetition, which is made worse when you're forced to replay sections of levels and rewatch unskippable cutscenes.

Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

Just like the film, death will eventually come to the colorful criminals, but Bloody Days makes it too often of an occurrence in part due to frustrating controls. While keyboard-and-mouse controls offer greater accuracy than a controller, latency between keystrokes and character actions can cause baffling, unexpected deaths. The gamepad fares far worse: The button layout is awkward, with the shoot and sprint actions placed on the bumpers instead of the shoulders, which will trip you up on more than one occasion. While each method of play allows you to choose between preset control schemes, they don't save, meaning that if you select option B instead of option A and exit back to the game, you default back to option A. This illusion of choice is frustrating, especially considering the other gamepad layouts are more accessible than the default.

Bloody Days does offer an initially compelling mechanic: At the press of a button, you can rewind time and switch to one of your two partners in crime. The actions you performed before switching will occur in real time as you head back into battle, allowing you to set up thrilling shootouts and increase your combo count to earn more points at the end of the heist. While this is exhilarating at first, especially when you're blasting through waves of enemies with twice the firepower, there are times when enemies you encountered as the first character inexplicably change their path, essentially nullifying any amount of strategy you put into setting up your initial run.

Lamentably, enemy AI is shallow: It's all too easy to corner foes and either fill them with lead or bash their heads in with a melee weapon. Exploiting the enemy's predictability like this also overshadows the time-rewind mechanic, which ultimately proves to be more of a risky tool than a necessity. While it's necessary for the two primary characters you take into battle to reach a mission's end point, you can rely on just a single character to handle the dirty work. The one exception is when the game puts enemies offscreen who nonetheless send bullets flying your way. This creates a challenge, but it also elicits frustration, since you're left floundering to avoid getting hit while returning fire to targets you can't actually see.

Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10
No Caption Provided

Bloody Days' aesthetic is enticing, with bright colors and generous amounts of blood--an otherwise gruesome picture that works to emphasize the comedic carnage on display. It's a shame, then, that the game's performance will kill you more often than the bullets will. During the later levels, Bloody Days chugs along and, in most situations, freezes for a few moments. This inconsistency will get you killed, get one of your partners killed, or occasionally allow you to kill every enemy in your way.

Aside from the Reservoir Dogs name in the title and the colorfully named characters, Bloody Days shares almost nothing in common with its namesake. With its rewind mechanic, you can see the potential for an exhilarating top-down, twin-stick shooter, but this never comes to pass. The game is easily exploitable and produces frustration far too often to become even the slightest bit interesting. Reservoir Dogs: Bloody Days devolves to a banal experience that's all bark and no bite.

Read More

Source: GameSpot - Reviews (Fri, 09 Jun 2017 09:00:00 -0700)

After the fateful plane crash that kicks off The Fidelio Incident, the panicked wife of our protagonist begs him to find the pages of a diary lost after impact, exclaiming, “They can’t find out who we are!” That statement ends up being a self-fulfilling prophecy for a game that, outside of first-person exploration, seems confused about what it really wants to be.

In part, The Fidelio Incident is a loose, modern interpretation of the Beethoven opera referenced in its title: a heroic tale of a faithful wife disguising herself as a man to rescue her falsely imprisoned husband. It's certainly a narrative we don't see terribly often in games, but alas, the only strong ties back to the opera here are the names of our main characters--Leonore and Stanley (Florestan in the opera)--and one particular bit of backstory found halfway through the game.

But there's an even more unique narrative about the Northern Ireland Conflict afoot, using Stanley and Leonore's burgeoning relationship in the mid-1980s as an access point to explore what 30 years of ugly, small-scale warfare can do to a country and its populace. This aspect at least gets a bit more room to breathe in The Fidelio Incident, delivered as part of Leonore's scattered diary and Stanley's own hallucinatory flashbacks, but this, too, ends up a secondary concern.

Ultimately, all of this is really the window dressing for a graphically impressive but mechanically undercooked journey where Stanley seeks to rescue Leonore after their prop plane crashes and burns in a freezing, desolate area of Iceland. Leonore ends up trapped under the smoldering ruins on a mountaintop. Meanwhile, Stanley is stranded at the mountain's base and has to take the long way up, braving deadly sub-zero temperatures and looking for life-saving heat sources.

This ends up being the crux of the game: Stanley moving up the mountain, on foot, while trying to stay warm. It’s a "struggle" that turns out to be conveniently easy; the plane crash has strewn fiery debris across the entire area, steam geysers are rampant, and a seemingly abandoned scientific research facility still has enough working mechanisms to let Stanley turn up the heat with the twist of a valve.

The turning of valves ends up being the core gameplay mechanic, supporting the rudimentary puzzles that dominate The Fidelio Incident's brief playtime. For example, turning a newfound valve will create a new heat source, which will lead you to the next checkpoint. Lacking in real challenge, the valve-based puzzles are an unimaginative substitute for any number of other survival tactics that could’ve been employed--although, ironically, every attempt made to momentarily shake things up also falls flat. One of the game's scant attempts to introduce variety to the formula is a puzzle involving a hailstorm that's unrealistically localized to a small area of the mountain, an odd choice that forcefully breaks your immersion in the otherwise natural and believable setting.

Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10
No Caption Provided

The fact that much of the game's story is delivered via diary pages--pages that so conveniently happened to fall unscathed next to scattered pieces of burning debris--feels similarly contrived, but the tale told within those diary pages tends to be when the game springs to life. Leonore's rapturous Irish lilt tells a tale of young love and attraction that, thanks to political and familial strife and one major, playable shocker of a criminal act, turns elegiac and regretful leading up to the present day. The Stanley and Leonore stranded on the mountain are middle-aged adults at the stage of their relationship where they're together because they don't know how to be with anyone else.

Their identities are further reinforced by strong vocal performances from Glenn Keogh and Bess Harrison. Stanley states the obvious with the fierce, all-encompassing realization of what he stands to lose if he can't locate his wife. And Leonore, hot-blooded and larger than life in the pages of the diary, is now tiny and frightened coming over Stanley's radio. The activities you engage in may be lacking, but the motivation to get through them is strong thanks to the sheer force of emotion.

Still, The Fidelio Incident being nice to look at and listen to doesn't necessarily make it interesting to play. The haunting, frozen vistas and enthralling backstory constantly trip over uninspired gameplay. Though there’s a measure of forgiveness to be had considering the length of the experience, even that concession is fragile in light of the obvious disparity that exists in the quality of the narrative and the gameplay that's forced upon it.

Read More

Source: GameSpot - Reviews (Thu, 08 Jun 2017 17:00:00 -0700)
We have a few tips to help you take better portraits at living museums.
Read More

Source: ePHOTOzine - Photography Techniques (Tue, 27 Jun 2017 00:10:03 GMT )
Read More

Source: Depreview - All Reviews & Previews (Sun, 12 Feb 2017 11:00:00 Z)

There are some first-rate performances in “King Arthur: Legend of the Sword,” most of them delivered by computer-generated animals.

Eagles swoop down from the sky to fend off hostile armed guards. Venomous snakes swell to Kraken-esque dimensions. Giant elephants stomp into battle and knock down...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Movie Reviews (Thu, 11 May 2017 12:05:00 PDT )

One of the first shots in writer-director Jared Cohn’s supernatural revenge thriller “Devil’s Domain” is of the bulimic teenage heroine Lisa (played by Madi Vodane) vomiting into a toilet. The image is revolting — and in questionable taste — but like a lot of this sloppy-but-fascinating mess of...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Movie Reviews (Thu, 18 May 2017 06:30:00 PDT )

“The Wall," a story of two American soldiers facing off against an unseen Iraqi adversary, is a men-at-war story more interesting than you might imagine. But not interesting enough.

Bringing to mind Steven Spielberg's debut feature "Duel" and similar hidden antagonist fare, "The Wall" benefits...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Movie Reviews (Thu, 11 May 2017 12:00:00 PDT )

Guy de Maupassant’s first novel, about a 19th century French noblewoman named Jeanne Le Perthuis des Vauds, was published under the title “Une Vie,” which translates simply as “A Life.” Stéphane Brizé’s piercingly sad and wise film adaptation bears the slightly embellished English-language title...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Movie Reviews (Thu, 11 May 2017 11:45:00 PDT )

The stillness of suburban life is deafening in Perth, Australia, circa 1987 — even more so as teenaged Vicki (Ashleigh Cummings) finds herself duped, drugged and chained to the bed of a serial-killing couple in “Hounds of Love,” Australian writer-director Ben Young’s harrowing debut thriller.

On...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Movie Reviews (Thu, 11 May 2017 17:15:00 PDT )

The effortlessly engaging “Folk Hero & Funny Guy” begins with the two title characters — a charismatic musician and a struggling stand-up comedian — recalling the same adventure from completely different perspectives. Was it a disaster or a “breakthrough” or a little bit of both?

The answers that...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Movie Reviews (Thu, 11 May 2017 12:10:00 PDT )

Cross “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” with “Thelma and Louise,” set it “Under the Tuscan Sun,” and you’d have something akin to “Like Crazy,” a vibrant and compelling look at friendship, freedom and the fine line between sanity and madness.

Beatrice (Valeria Bruni Tedeschi) is a grandly delusional,...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Movie Reviews (Thu, 11 May 2017 06:00:00 PDT )

“My name is Roger Stone and I’m an agent provocateur,” proclaims the proudly infamous Trump confidant in his introduction to the endlessly fascinating, bracingly up-to-the-minute Netflix documentary bearing his name.

Those offering their own appraisals in “Get Me Roger Stone,” including the president,...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Movie Reviews (Thu, 11 May 2017 12:35:00 PDT )

At the age of 81, Eleanor Coppola makes her narrative feature directorial debut with “Paris Can Wait,” a winsome tale of a road trip through the French countryside starring Diane Lane. Coppola, who previously directed shorts and documentaries, including “Hearts of Darkness,” about the making of...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Movie Reviews (Thu, 11 May 2017 11:40:00 PDT )

The Supreme Court handed President Trump a victory Monday by reviving his disputed ban on foreign travelers from six Muslim-majority nations.

The justices largely rejected a series of lower-court orders that had blocked Trump’s policy from taking effect.

The justices said the travel ban may go...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Mon, 26 Jun 2017 07:45:00 PDT )
June 25, 2017, 8:34 p.m. Chance the Rapper, in impassioned BET Awards speech, asks judges for convictions Todd Martens (Richard Shotwell / Invision / Associated Press) Chicago's Chance the Rapper gave a fiery, seemingly off-the-cuff speech at the BET Awards on Sunday night in which he chastised... Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Mon, 26 Jun 2017 07:00:00 PDT )
Learn how to turn your photographs into fake miniature toy models with the help of Photoshop.
Read More

Source: ePHOTOzine - All Photography Articles (Mon, 26 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT )
It's time to announce the third June Photo Month winner who's got their hands on Plus membership this month.
Read More

Source: ePHOTOzine - All Photography Articles (Mon, 26 Jun 2017 12:59:20 GMT )
A stunning butterfly image has been awarded the POTW accolade.
Read More

Source: ePHOTOzine - All Photography Articles (Mon, 26 Jun 2017 10:41:15 GMT )
In “The New Urban Crisis,” Richard Florida argues that the revival of central cities has made them more unequal and more segregated. Read More

Source: The New York Times - Sunday Review (Mon, 26 Jun 2017 09:00:23 GMT )
Northern Ireland and Papua New Guinea don’t seem so different in Nick Laird’s new novel, “Modern Gods.” Read More

Source: The New York Times - Sunday Review (Mon, 26 Jun 2017 09:00:23 GMT )

Tamar Braxton saw an opening, and she took it.

Performing midway through Sunday’s BET Awards, the R&B singer and reality-television star tore into her song “My Man” — about how you should “never trust a lonely woman with the one you love” — as though her life depended on it.

She whipped her long...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sun, 25 Jun 2017 22:25:00 PDT )

The annual congressional baseball game dates back to 1909 and is now one of the only public displays of bipartisanship left in Washington, D.C. The game, which pits Republicans against Democrats, mirrors similar events that dominate American culture every summer — Little League competitions, corporate...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sun, 25 Jun 2017 19:04:00 PDT )

Franklin Gutierrez was in the original starting lineup Sunday. By 11 a.m., two hours before the Dodgers played the Colorado Rockies, the veteran outfielder was on the 10-day disabled list because of a rare inflammatory disease called ankylosing spondylitis, which forced him to sit out the 2014...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sun, 25 Jun 2017 19:05:00 PDT )

The very cool Overwatch community creations keep coming. Today's example is Junkrat's RIP-Tire remade in with Legos. A lot of Legos.

YouTuber ZaziNombies LEGO Creations highlighted his latest creation in a new video, explaining that the Lego RIP-Tire is made up of around 4,500 Lego pieces. As you can see in the video, it is not as sturdy as it is in the game--rolling it leads to its undoing. But it's a very impressive creation, for sure, including the chain and tire treads. Here's the video (via Game Informer):

The RIP-Tire is a "motorized tire bomb" that is one of Junkrat's devastating abilities. It rolls across the battlefield, able to climb obstacles, with the player remotely detonating it for maximum effectiveness. Alternatively, it will explode on its own eventually.

This is not the first epic Lego video game creation from ZaziNombies. Some of his past work includes a Call of Duty: Black Ops III flamethrower that throws actual flames and Doom's BFG. You can see all of his amazing creations here on YouTube.

In other Overwatch news, a new update is out now on the game's PTR. It focuses on overhauling the Loot Box and Highlights systems, and also includes some other quality-of-life improvements and bug fixes. You can see the full patch notes here.

Read More

Source: GameSpot Gaming Reviews (Sun, 25 Jun 2017 19:15:00 -0700)

Ben Jaffe was all smiles for most of the hour or so he spent onstage at Arroyo Seco Weekend, a new music festival that debuted Saturday and Sunday on the leafy grounds surrounding the Rose Bowl in Pasadena.

But near the end of his set with New Orleans’ boisterous Preservation Hall Jazz Band, the...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sun, 25 Jun 2017 17:05:00 PDT )

The Town Of Light feels like a victim of its own design. While it tells an interesting albeit disturbing story of mental health treatment in the early 1900s, it's plagued by repetitious gameplay, long load times, and visual issues that hold it back from delivering the impact it strives to deliver.

Based on real accounts from the 1930s and '40s, The Town of Light focuses on Renee, a young woman who's suffered from severe mental illness for the majority of her life. Her struggle began with sporadic blackouts as a child and eventually developed into bouts of anxiety and the sounds of strange voices in her head. Pushed over the edge by the horrors of a sexual assault, Renee is callously committed to the real-world Ospedale Psichiatrico di Volterra, an understaffed, overcrowded asylum in the Tuscan town of Volterra, Italy.

You assume control of Renee after the fact; at a time when the asylum has long been abandoned. She's a somewhat unreliable narrator, failing to recall exactly what occurred during her tenure at the asylum. The vast majority of your time is spent wandering the halls and grounds of the large hospital, piecing together what happened to Renee during her stint. You revisit sites of traumatic events, discover and study pages from her journal, and page through medical records, which offer eye-opening insight into the horrifying, violent ways mentally ill patients were treated nearly a century ago.

No Caption Provided
Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

While The Town of Light struggles with portraying the ways in which people cope with mental health issues, it at least makes piecing Renee's story together an interesting process. The twists and turns therein are paced well enough that you'll remain engaged throughout. Some exposition may be drip-fed to players through found documents and the like, while big story beats are presented as hand-drawn cutscenes. Each method is linked to a different part of Renee's story, whether it’s recalling the doctors who abused her, the fellow female patient who helped her explore her own sexuality, or the circumstances that led to her hospitalization in the first place.

These moments are carried by solid art direction; letters are detailed and appear to be written by hand. Flipping through Renee's journal reveals a number of dark and thought-provoking drawings that supplement the anecdote she's sharing. Despite the generally static presentation, the game's hand-drawn cutscenes utilize a unique crosshatched, watercolor style. When it comes to the The Town of Light's tiny details, there's plenty to admire despite the heavy context that surrounds it.

While the hospital is large, with tons of rooms to explore to find the aforementioned narrative tidbits, the drab and ugly environments do take their toll, and not in a way that reinforces Renee's tragic story. For the majority of the game, you'll walk through the same hallways filled with similar-looking rooms looking for scraps of evidence, guided only by vague objectives. This persists until the last third of the game, when you step outside the asylum's walls--a turn that isn't as uplifting as it sounds.

At first you're sent to the asylum's outer grounds to examine headstones in a graveyard, but you're then transported into a cognitive labyrinth in Renee's mind. You'll walk endlessly, trying in vain to figure out where to go and what to do next. Suddenly and for no explicable reason, you're sent back into the asylum. Both of these sections are confusingly designed, stretching on far longer than feels necessary. It's at this stage that The Town of Light stops being an interesting examination of a troubled mind, and becomes a frustrating game that may not be worth completing after all.

At least on Xbox One, all of this is made worse by poor technical performance. There are consistent frame rate issues when you're exploring outside the asylum, where turning in any direction also results in noticeable screen tearing. Load times are equally off-putting, stretching on for upwards of a minute at a time. This is also the case within menus, where opening up the collectibles screen comes at the cost of about a 30-second wait.

It's disappointing to see The Town of Light struggle so often, because the story it presents is both harrowing and captivating at times. While there's an interesting narrative to be found in its world, the moment-to-moment gameplay and repetitive environments impose an unavoidable malaise. Given the fact that the game is based on actual accounts of psychiatric treatment in the early 1900s, you might be better off looking up the real stories that inspired The Town of Light rather than forcing your way through a version of them here.

Read More

Source: GameSpot - Reviews (Wed, 07 Jun 2017 17:00:00 -0700)

Spoiler Warning: The following review contains a detailed recap of the events in the final episode of A New Frontier.

From the Gallows stumbles to its conclusion much like the walkers that finally appear in this concluding episode of Telltale Games' A New Frontier. While this closing act ties all the dangling plotlines into a neat bow, the fiery promise of its predecessors sputters out due to some odd dramatic choices. Everything plays out too predictably and is too indulgent of Walking Dead franchise cliches to be particularly satisfying to those who have followed the travails of Javi Garcia and his erstwhile flame (and sister-in-law) Kate since Episode One arrived just before last Christmas.

Of course, it's hard to properly critique From the Gallows without delving into the narrative that unfolds in this episode. The story picks up precisely where the last episode, Thicker Than Water, concluded. The fortress town of Richmond has just exploded into civil war with a gunfight on the streets. Kate has accidentally plowed a stolen truck into a wall, allowing a herd of zombies into the heart of the city--and apparently killing herself in the resulting explosion. In short, everything has gone completely to hell.

Or has it? Kate is soon seen none the worse for wear, despite riding an exploding truck into a wall that's soon overrun by zombies. The wild gun battle abruptly ends as everyone runs away from the incoming walkers. Walking Dead and general action-movie cliches come fast and furiously. Your core group of survivors flee across rooftops in scenes that evoke moments from earlier Telltale seasons, as well as those from early episodes of the TV series. Javi uses zombie guts as camouflage to walk between zombies. The guy you think is going to die does die, almost immediately after a dialogue sequence that concludes any unfinished business hanging over the plot from the last episode. He might as well be wearing a red shirt and beaming down to a planet with Captain Kirk.

No Caption Provided

Disappointingly, the big showdown between Javi and David is a huge letdown. These two hate each other, and they're both in love with the same woman, so you expect fireworks. Instead, you get pretty much nothing. Even after it's fully revealed that Kate is in love with Javi and wants nothing to do with her hothead hubby, the brothers do nothing more than get into a brawl that's capped by David taking off in a truck with his son Gabe. You can't help but be disappointed, especially if you take the high road and refuse to fight back, honoring the wishes expressed by your father in the opening prologue.

Even worse, David dies offscreen. The truck gets overwhelmed by zombies. David gets bitten. Gabe has to finish off his dad. All of this is recounted to you via a dialogue scene when Gabe returns--which, of course, ruins any sense of closure to the story between Javi and David that's been the underpinning of this entire season. It's all wrapped up by an oddly cold denouement. Javi and Kate go to David's body, she pulls off his Army dog tags, and then buries them without a word of eulogy. She even leaves her wedding ring on the dirt. David was a complete jerk through all of A New Frontier, to the point that you were clearly meant to root for Javi and Kate to get together, but this ending comes off cold to the point of being cruel. For the first time in the season, it's hard not to feel sorry for the guy.

This whole sequence may well change depending on a choice you make to either stay with Kate when she goes to help Richmond or go off in pursuit of David and Gabe--or if you chose earlier on to avoid any sort of commitment to Kate. Multiple replays are likely needed to unveil everything. But there's no way that David should be allowed to die off-screen no matter what choices are made by the player. The feud between the brothers and the love triangle between them and Kate plays too big a part in this season for this to ever occur. And it's pretty likely to happen to most players, given how much it makes sense for you to stay with Kate at the end considering the growing relationship--and how much the natural ending of the game is for Javi and Kate to wind up together.

With all that said, From the Gallows isn't entirely frustrating. The happy ending with Javi and Kate will be really satisfying to shippers rooting for them all along, especially given how few of these moments occur in the Walking Dead universe. There's a lot of action here too, mostly featuring Javi gunning down walkers. There isn't much challenge involved, but it's still nice to get more involved and to be directly threatened by a whole lot of undead for what's really the first time this season.

Clementine is used reasonably well as a background character--which seems fitting, given that this isn't her story. The writers do a great job of easing her into the supporting cast so that she remains a presence, but one that doesn't overwhelm the real protagonists. The only oddity with Clem's story comes at the very end, when she heads off into the sunset to find her lost surrogate son with no survival gear besides a pistol and a knife. All this conclusion needs is the sad piano music featured at the end of old episodes of <i>The Incredible Hulk</i>.

After a strong start, A New Frontier ends on a slightly weak note with From the Gallows. This season had its high points, and it remains well worth playing, especially if you're a serious fan of the Walking Dead franchise, due to the generally superb dialogue, voice acting, and stylish comic-book visuals. But an overall lack of player interaction, too many cliches, and a lame, predictable climax that goes out with a whimper instead of a bang make the season much less memorable than it could've been.

Read More

Source: GameSpot - Reviews (Wed, 07 Jun 2017 18:00:00 -0700)

Telltale's Guardians of the Galaxy series slows down with Episode 2. After an action-packed first episode, the second's slower pace leaves room for more substantial character moments. On occasion, however, that space is filled with manufactured drama, as key decisions revolve around playing favorites with the Guardians in a way that comes off as petty high school drama instead of the culmination of natural tension among the group. Fortunately, there's enough mystery in the story to carry the episode through to its to-be-continued ending, drama and all.

Most of the episode consists of point-and-click exploration and conversations with less of a focus on Telltale-style quick-time events. Compared to the cinematic first episode, in which the game-y elements felt like interruptions, this episode flows a lot better, albeit more slowly. The few quick-time sequences that are present don't feel like the game is checking in to make sure you're paying attention, and it flows between conversations and exploration well.

The Guardians are left reeling after the events of the first episode. Their next step is to learn more about the Eternity Forge, a relic in their possession that has the power to resurrect the dead. It's a strange enough artifact to drive the story forward without much action--it gave Peter visions of his long-dead mother, and he's not the only one who has someone they'd want to bring back to life. The first big decision involves either hunting down Gamora's highly dangerous sister, Nebula, so she can translate runes on the Eternity Forge, or going on a side mission with Rocket to see if he can bring back someone he's lost.

It's the only decision in the episode that's at all difficult. I repeatedly sided with Gamora in the first episode and chose to go with Rocket in the second, even though Nebula was definitely going to do a bit of murdering before we could catch up to her. Gamora's disapproving gaze is very cutting, but Rocket's story is worth exploring and makes him a much more sympathetic character than in the previous episode. (It also involves an adorable anthropomorphic otter.)

After that, though, the episode relies heavily on easy-to-avoid drama to fill the gaps between points of interest. I ended up siding with Gamora about something later, which upset Drax, since I'd picked Gamora over him before--but since Drax mostly just supplies comedic relief and promises to fight his way through any problem, going with the level-headed Gamora is an obvious choice, especially when it involves her sister. Talking to a mopey Drax is kind of like dealing with a five-year-old and doesn't make for the most interesting conversations, either.

That said, I was more curious about the mysteries of the Eternity Forge and my companions' backstories this time around than I was with the first instalment--even though the drama often feels forced, there's substance to each character that's given a chance to shine this episode. The prospect of resurrection gives everyone an opportunity to show more emotion, and Gamora and Nebula's conversation in particular is both important and interesting to participate in.

Even though the drama often feels forced, there's substance to each character that's given a chance to shine this episode.

Small technical hiccups break up the flow, though. The facial animations are inconsistent and don't always sync neatly with dialogue, and I had to restart a sequence because an important prompt never appeared and stopped progression. It's less an issue of performance than polish, but it interrupts the already slow pace of the episode.

By the ending cliffhanger, Guardians creates enough of a mystery with the Eternity Forge--specifically the process and cost of using it--to segue into the next episode. Emotions run high, and that works well for Rocket's story as well as the conflict between Gamora and Nebula, but other pivotal choices seem like overblown drama between kids instead of a ragtag band of heroes. It lacks action and big reveals, but it sets up a lot of different avenues to potentially explore down the line.

Read More

Source: GameSpot - Reviews (Thu, 08 Jun 2017 13:26:00 -0700)
Read More

Source: Depreview - All Reviews & Previews (Wed, 01 Mar 2017 14:00:00 Z)
Tips on how to successfully photograph the people who live in the place you're travelling to.
Read More

Source: ePHOTOzine - Photography Techniques (Mon, 26 Jun 2017 00:10:04 GMT )

Edgar Wright’s “Baby Driver” roars into theaters, while Bong Jong-ho’s “Okja” arrives on Netflix and in selected theaters a month after its debut at Cannes. The animated sequel “Despicable Me 3” and the Will Ferrell-Amy Poehler comedy “The House” are in wide release.

-------------

Jun 28

Baby Driver...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews ( Sun, 25 Jun 2017 06:00:00 PDT )

SOUTH PACIFIC

Presentation

Bernadette Murphy will take you to the French Polynesian islands of Moorea, Rangiroa and Marlon Brando’s private atoll, Tetiaroa.

When, where: 7:30 p.m. Monday at Distant Lands, 20 S. Raymond Ave., Pasadena.

Admission, info: Free. RSVP to (626) 449-3220.

CAMPING

Presentation

... Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sun, 25 Jun 2017 06:00:00 PDT )

Frida Laura Virella sings the title role in Long Beach Opera’s staging of Robert Xavier Rodríguez’s opera about Mexican artist Frida Kahlo; in Spanish and English with projected subtitles. Museum of Latin American Art, 628 Alamitos Ave., Long Beach. Ends Sun., 8 p.m. $49-$150. (562) 470-7464.

... Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sun, 25 Jun 2017 06:00:00 PDT )

Twice I’ve seen fanaticism at work. Now I see the signs a third time.

I was born in Tehran to a Muslim family. When I was 6, we traveled to London to see my grandmother and returned home as Christians. Then, for three years in Isfahan, I attended school in a head scarf that obscured my neck and...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sun, 25 Jun 2017 04:00:00 PDT )

Earlier this month, a committee of the Los Angeles City Council backed a plan to reframe Columbus Day as Indigenous Peoples Day, following the lead of Berkeley, Denver, Phoenix and the state of Vermont. The proposal now goes to the full council. It should vote yes, and the sooner the better. Giving...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sun, 25 Jun 2017 04:00:00 PDT )

They’ve been begged by star players to stop it, fined repeatedly, and threatened with dramatic sanctions that could hurt their national team’s chances in the World Cup.

But Mexican soccer fans have been loath to give up their favorite game-day chant, a homophobic slur that has been condemned by...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sun, 25 Jun 2017 03:00:00 PDT )

The “i-word” has been on the tongues and in the tweets of several of California’s House Democrats. Rep. Jackie Speier has said impeachment is “really the only way we can go” if the facts show President Trump obstructed justice in the Russia investigation. Rep. Ted Lieu tweeted a photo of his weekend...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sun, 25 Jun 2017 03:00:00 PDT )

Perhaps no part of California has thought more about the future of voting than Orange County. And yet when it comes to a sweeping change to state elections, the county has decided to take a pass.

In fact, recent events serve as a cautionary tale that changing elections is hard, even when the plan...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sun, 25 Jun 2017 00:05:00 PDT )

Ike Opara scored on a bicycle kick in Sporting Kansas City's 2-1 victory over the Galaxy on Saturday night.

Opara made it 2-0 with his stunning score over charging goalkeeper Clement Diop in the 35th minute after taking a lofted pass from Matt Besler.

Roger Espinoza opened the scoring for Kansas...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sat, 24 Jun 2017 21:50:00 PDT )

When the young singer-songwriter Khalid played “Coaster,” the last song of his set Friday night at the BET Experience at Staples Center, he stood in front of a digitally chopped graphic of the American flag.

For a second, it looked like a glitch in the onstage projection. But as he sang over the...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sat, 24 Jun 2017 21:35:00 PDT )

Yemen's internationally recognized government on Saturday ordered the creation of a committee to investigate allegations of human rights violations after reports that U.S. military interrogators worked with forces from the United Arab Emirates who are accused of torturing detainees in Yemen.

A...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sat, 24 Jun 2017 18:45:00 PDT )

Like so many of the youngsters chosen in the annual NHL draft, Jaret Anderson-Dolan watched his parents skate and he took to the ice on a pair of double-runners before he was 2 years old. Like many of those kids, he developed a terrific shot by rifling the puck hundreds of times a day at the rink...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sat, 24 Jun 2017 18:40:00 PDT )
Head out to the beach in time for the sunset and shoot some coastal imagery.
Read More

Source: ePHOTOzine - All Photography Articles (Sun, 25 Jun 2017 00:10:03 GMT )
This super-powered drone comes with a remote with a built-in screen, an upgrade from the smartphone controller. The post Review: DJI Phantom 4 Pro+ appeared first on WIRED. Read More

Source: WIRED - Product Reviews (Fri, 16 Jun 2017 13:00:53 +0000 )
Review: Audeze iSine 20
With the right tunes and the right setting, it becomes clear that what Audeze has done here borders on miraculous. The post Review: Audeze iSine 20 appeared first on WIRED. Read More

Source: WIRED - Product Reviews (Mon, 29 May 2017 11:00:33 +0000 )
Our 12 Favorite Laptops, From MacBooks to Chromebooks
If you're shopping for a new portable PC, here are 12 great options. The post Our 12 Favorite Laptops, From MacBooks to Chromebooks appeared first on WIRED. Read More

Source: WIRED - Product Reviews (Fri, 16 Jun 2017 11:00:51 +0000 )

Rapper Tupac Shakur was a revolutionary; a controversial, brilliant artist cut down in his prime who grew even more iconic after his death. The son of a Black Panther, a high school chum of Jada Pinkett Smith and a vanguard of West Coast gangsta rap, Shakur endured, and produced. far more in his...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Movie Reviews (Fri, 16 Jun 2017 00:05:00 PDT )

After the surprising success of last year's “girl with shark” thriller “The Shallows,” “47 Meters Down” seems to be posing the question, “what if ‘The Shallows’ went deep?” (And you know exactly how deep from the title). This time there are two girls, not just the one, though star Mandy Moore is...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Movie Reviews (Thu, 15 Jun 2017 22:00:00 PDT )

As a quirky Nintendo take on fighting games, Arms doesn't start off on the right foot. Its unique fighting mechanics are hard to get used to, and learning its unusual controls and cadence can initially be frustrating. But once you wrap your head around the basics, you begin to recognize what it takes to win--clumsy punches become complex counters, and reacting to your opponent becomes instinctive as you settle into Arms' peculiar pacing. If you can get past its unavoidable learning curve, you'll find that Arms packs a fighting challenge that's unlike anything you've played before and is fun in ways you wouldn't expect.

Spring-loaded punches are the center of Arms' combat. Your fighter's arms have an incredibly long reach and take time to extend and retract. You are encouraged to play using motion controls with a Joy-Con in each hand, but that introduces a dissonance between the length of your in-game arm and your real life arm--by the time you're physically ready to punch again, your virtual arm is still on its return trip. It's easier to learn simple punches and timing with traditional controls, via the Pro Controller, which allow for more precise movements.

The timing of your punches, grabs, and blocks is critical--punch with your left arm too soon after punching with your right, and you'll be left open and vulnerable until they return. There's a rock-paper-scissors element to all of this, too: blocking stops punches, grabs overpower blocks, and punches deflect grabs. Being able to read the speed of a punch and block before it hits or side-step and throw a punch of your own is tricky, and learning how to do so is an unavoidable but frustrating hurdle. Arms can feel sluggish at first, but once you put in the time to understand its distinct give-and-take, you are freed up to confidently dodge, dash, and jump around the battlefield.

One of the great things about Arms is that you don't have to learn combos or other complex inputs that characterize most fighting games. However, beyond building a strong understanding of when to act and when to hold back, you will need to understand how the game's various equippable arms can impact your strategies and tactics in battle. You can pick out different arm configurations before entering a match, and they come with special properties, like disabling your opponent's arms or freezing their entire body in place. In addition to their individual physicality, each fighter has a unique ability: Twintelle can slow opponents' punches in midair, Ribbon Girl has a handy double jump, and Ninjara teleports while dashing, to name a few. So while Arms isn't a mechanically complex fighting game, it does require that you think on your feet and pay attention to who you're facing off against and the individual strengths each character brings into a match.

Yet, for all the knowledge and skill you acquire while continually playing Arms, you may find that your control scheme of choice has the biggest impact on your effectiveness in battle, even if both options come with notable caveats. Motion controls lack the precision of playing with a Pro Controller, but the person playing with analog sticks will have to manage curving punches and moving around with the same stick--a less than ideal scenario. Nonetheless, it's rare that a person throwing punches in real life manages to beat the player with both hands on a stationary controller.

One of the great things about Arms is that you don't have to learn combos or other complex inputs that characterize most fighting games.

Arms is without a doubt at its best with two players facing off using the same controls. Single-player Arms is a little less exciting, with a sharp difficulty curve and the loss of a living, breathing adversary, the absence of which partially deflates the otherwise fascinating combat. Like with any competitive game, playing online is valuable for understanding the meta and which characters are considered top-tier; as for local multiplayer, it's fun (if not a little silly) to flail about in front of the TV with someone else vying for the crown.

With or without a human opponent, you can hop into extra modes to try out your moves under new circumstances, such as target practice or Arms-style volleyball. These diversions are better as warm-ups or palette cleansers between fights--they're treated like mini-games, and don't necessitate the same adaptability as fights themselves. Once you figure out the best way to win at volleyball, for example, you won't have to change your strategy much to continue winning.

Arms is a strong, substantial fighting game that takes a while to really hit its stride. Its barrier to entry is unlike anything else in the genre, but it's one worth tackling in order to get at the game's fascinating take on fighting. It may not have the same skill requirement as other fighting games, but the flexibility and fast thinking it requires secures it as one that works on its own terms and opens the genre up to a wider audience.

Read More

Source: GameSpot - Reviews (Wed, 07 Jun 2017 07:00:00 -0700)
Read More

Source: Depreview - All Reviews & Previews (Sun, 23 Apr 2017 10:00:00 Z)
Read More

Source: Depreview - All Reviews & Previews (Mon, 27 Mar 2017 14:00:00 Z)

Steel Division: Normandy '44 is a very peculiar sort of real-time strategy game. Instead of trying to encapsulate hundreds of years of history or even the entirety of a single war, Steel Division is all about the specifics. Your pool of units is limited to a few key types. The rest is emergent--these soldiers and their gear were designed to work in tandem, so you'll need to as well. But that leads to beautiful match pacing and aggressive fights that hinge on your intelligence and your mastery of the battlefield.

As you might have guessed, given the name, Steel Division centers on the lead-up to (and resolution of) the 1944 Normandy beach invasion in World War II--better known as "D-Day." What's a bit more surprising, though, is the game's exhaustive approach to detail. The whole of the French countryside has been accurately reproduced here with the help of Royal Air Force reconnaissance photos of the time. For the purposes of play, that means real-world schemes work just as well here.

No Caption Provided
Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

That, plus the fact that Steel Division comes from hardcore strategy publisher Paradox Interactive, might lead you to think the game isn't inviting to new players. Thankfully, however, that's not the case. Steel Division may layer on meta-strategy later on, but the basics are rather simple. You'll be working with the standard array of tanks, vehicles, infantry, and artillery. The game includes dozens of variants of each, based on different historical divisions and nations, but as far as the single-player mode goes, that's all you need to know.

Matches focus entirely on how well you leverage each of these units' strengths and use them as an interdependent network. There's no base-building or resource management to pad this out. You aren't getting big unit upgrades or fiddling with new supply lines. You have one "resource" that builds up over time, and you spend it to deploy new units. You order up troops, you pick where you want them, and that's it. It's fortunate, then, that this foundation is more than strong enough to carry the experience.

Steel Division gets a lot of mileage out of some very simple concepts. On any given map, you're only managing about 10 different unit types. With those, you'll be either holding an area or heading off to kill some guys--defense or offense. Units counter one another in a simple, self-explanatory order. Anti-tank infantry is for taking out tanks, of course--put them where you don't want tanks rolling. That may sound flippant, but it's not. Each of these units aligns their real-world equivalent so well that your task might be simple, but the outcome won't be. While you’re setting up your heavy infantry, your foe is no doubt preparing their artillery to pin down your anti-tank rifles.

This works because the game limits ammunition, forcing you to resupply every so often, and those units are, as you might suspect, squishy. This forces you to divert resources to supply critical positions you hold and means that you’re always a little bit vulnerable. It’s impossible to perfectly secure your trucks, but foes won’t always know where you'll come from. There’s a psychological element here that elevates the stakes and complexity of play. The sum of those elements working in tandem is some ferocious blood sport.

The adrenaline of pulling together a coordinated attack is priceless, and Steel Division is all about chaining these moments together, directed as they are by an aggressive tie to historical realism.

You'll have to constantly scan the field, checking up on unit progress and making sure they have enough munitions. It's a lot of micromanagement, but there's enough tactical diversity that it works. Most matches will have you rapidly switching between softening up sturdy targets so that you can secure a new location and running door-to-door to clear out homes with your infantry. Success takes constant vigilance over the field.

For the most part, that's not too hard to manage. The campaign, which is broken up into three sections with four missions in each, doesn't tax the mind too hard too fast. Instead, you'll get a steady introduction to more advanced concepts--like the ludicrously detailed sightlines and how you can and need to use each unit's sphere of awareness to your advantage. You'll play with their use and application a bit before moving onto a new lesson. It teaches you well enough, but it really just serves as a lead into the multiplayer and that mode is raucous fun.

Steel Division lets you group up into teams of up to nine human players, and that dramatically increases the complexity of your tactics. You can apply pressure to enemies by leading them through elaborate ambushes or pulling together an aggressive pincer flank. You'll notice, however, that there's not a lot to be done with defense--that due to the fact that, without bases as a center of power, there's nothing that really needs defending directly. Your necessities are ad hoc: Secure this point so that you can field an assault from that one, for example. This reflects the mobility of the Normandy assault and that neither side was keen on settling in for a drawn-out, bloody fight.

You may scoff at that, though, after your first few multiplayer games. Games with other humans (or even AI) can run on any of several maps that can scale up to positively ridiculous sizes. They exist to encourage dynamic, emergent stories. A hamlet locked down by machine guns and flamethrowers could be a ploy to lure an armored assault, letting you counter with a barrage of heavy artillery. Being at once divorced from the realism of the Second World War and intimately tied to its combatants, location, and gear means that you can arrange high-stakes scenarios that no commander would orchestrate. That leads to some incredible moments when the ploys do actually work out. If they don't, your front may collapse, but a steady stream of resources means you'll probably be able to mount some type of defense in short order.

That synergy leads to its own sort of intra-game pacing. At first, players will all be jockeying for position, but as they settle in, attacks become directed and concentrated--especially with teammates. Then the match shifts to center on how you can best capitalize on openings you've created without overreacting. Overcommitting soldiers can strain your ability to supply them with ammunition--meaning you may earn a temporary foothold in a new spot, but you'll have to be active to make it last. Similarly, swinging too hard against an enemy will turn you into easy pickings. While most strategy games lean on rock-paper-scissors combat pretty heavily, rarely is the difference in effectiveness so pronounced. Artillery shreds vehicles so fast, you'd think the targets might as well have been tissue paper. There’s a solid counter to everything, and the challenge becomes finding that solution and deploying it well in countless different micro-scenarios.

Pinning down enemies with suppressing fire is a blast. So, too, is a well-executed offensive that cracks and divides enemy front lines. The adrenaline of pulling together a coordinated attack is priceless, and Steel Division is all about chaining these moments together, directed as they are by an aggressive tie to historical realism. If there's one failing here, it's that the game doesn't offer many chances to explore that rich field on your own before jumping into multiplayer matches. But when it all comes together in the perfect match, Steel Division's magic is undeniable.

Read More

Source: GameSpot - Reviews (Wed, 07 Jun 2017 10:00:00 -0700)
There are 20 £50 Pixum vouchers up for grabs in June's competition.
Read More

Source: ePHOTOzine - All Photography Articles (Fri, 23 Jun 2017 14:00:01 GMT )

Astrid Saenz has always wanted to be a police officer and is among the most decorated cadets in the Los Angeles Police Department’s signature youth program.

Saenz, 18, has been an LAPD cadet for the last three years, rising to the rank of cadet commander while volunteering her time at the Devonshire...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sat, 24 Jun 2017 11:45:00 PDT )
Here are the best news, features, reviews and technique articles from ePHOTOzine this week.
Read More

Source: ePHOTOzine - All Photography Articles (Sat, 24 Jun 2017 13:00:06 GMT )

A series of attacks in three Pakistani cities Friday left at least 61 people dead and many injured, authorities said.

A suicide bomber in the city of Quetta killed at least 12 people and injured about 20, officials said. Some of the injured were hospitalized in critical condition.

The injured groaned...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sat, 24 Jun 2017 01:05:00 PDT )
When you think of landscape photography, a 50mm lens is probably not what you reach for but Toma Bonciu did exactly that for his foggy 50mm lens challenge.
Read More

Source: ePHOTOzine - Equipment Reviews (Sat, 24 Jun 2017 09:00:02 GMT )

Certain homes are like old friends, coming back around to surprise us every now and again. This week we revisited a classic in the San Fernando Valley and dove deep into the wonderful world of rapper real estate.

Once you’re done perusing these latest transactions, tell us your favorite on the ...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sat, 24 Jun 2017 00:05:00 PDT )

Alex Lange limited top-seeded Oregon State to two hits over 7 1/3 innings, and LSU ended the Beavers' 23-game winning streak with a 3-1 victory on Friday to set up a winner-take-all Bracket 1 final at the College World Series.

The teams will meet again Saturday, with the winner going to the best-of-three...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Fri, 23 Jun 2017 21:05:00 PDT )
We are heading back in time to capture the sights and sounds of a battle.
Read More

Source: ePHOTOzine - All Photography Articles (Sat, 24 Jun 2017 00:10:08 GMT )
Rankings are based on October figures. Read More

Source: The New York Times - Best Sellers ( Sat, 06 Nov 2010 05:27:10 GMT )
Keith Richards’s autobiography, “Life,” hits the hardcover nonfiction list at No. 1, unsurprisingly. Read More

Source: The New York Times - Best Sellers ( Fri, 05 Nov 2010 15:46:40 GMT )
Rankings are based on October figures. Read More

Source: The New York Times - Best Sellers (Sat, 06 Nov 2010 05:22:46 GMT )
Top 5 at a Glance
1. SUPERMAN: EARTH ONE, by J. Michael Straczynski and Shane Davis
2. Y: THE LAST MAN - DELUXE EDITION, BOOK 4, by Brian K. Vaughan and Pia Guerra
3. THE WALKING DEAD, BOOK 6, by Robert Kirkman and Charlie Adlard
4. THE EXILE: AN OUTLANDER GRAPHIC NOVEL, by Diana Gabaldon and Hoang Nguyen
5. THE ADVENTURES OF OOK AND GLUK, by George Beard and Harold Hutchins Read More

Source: The New York Times - Best Sellers (Fri, 05 Nov 2010 01:18:07 GMT )
Top 5 at a Glance
1. SCAREDY-CAT, SPLAT!, written and illustrated by Rob Scotton
2. LLAMA LLAMA HOLIDAY DRAMA, written and illustrated by Anna Dewdney
3. FABULOUS FASHION BOUTIQUE, by Jane O’Connor
4. KNUFFLE BUNNY FREE, written and illustrated by Mo Willems
5. HEADS, written and illustrated by Matthew Van Fleet Read More

Source: The New York Times - Best Sellers (Fri, 05 Nov 2010 16:16:30 GMT )
Top 5 at a Glance
1. THE FIVE LOVE LANGUAGES, by Gary Chapman
2. WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU’RE EXPECTING, by Heidi Murkoff and Sharon Mazel
3. CRAZY LOVE, by Francis Chan with Danae Yankoski
4. THE LOVE DARE, by Stephen and Alex Kendrick with Lawrence Kimbrough
5. RADICAL, by David Platt Read More

Source: The New York Times - Best Sellers (Fri, 05 Nov 2010 01:34:57 GMT )
Top 5 at a Glance
1. BAREFOOT CONTESSA: HOW EASY IS THAT?, by Ina Garten
2. DOUBLE DELICIOUS, by Jessica Seinfeld
3. THE TATTOO CHRONICLES, by Kat Von D with Sandra Bark
4. DELIVERING HAPPINESS, by Tony Hsieh
5. BOBBY FLAY'S THROWDOWN!, by Bobby Flay with Stephanie Banyas and Miriam Garron Read More

Source: The New York Times - Best Sellers (Fri, 05 Nov 2010 16:14:42 GMT )
Top 5 at a Glance
1. EAT, PRAY, LOVE, by Elizabeth Gilbert
2. INSIDE OF A DOG, by Alexandra Horowitz
3. STONES INTO SCHOOLS, by Greg Mortenson
4. THE GLASS CASTLE, by Jeannette Walls
5. THREE CUPS OF TEA, by Greg Mortenson and David Oliver Relin Read More

Source: The New York Times - Best Sellers (Fri, 05 Nov 2010 01:27:40 GMT )
Top 5 at a Glance
1. THE LOST SYMBOL, by Dan Brown
2. THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO, by Stieg Larsson
3. THE RECKLESS BRIDE, by Stephanie Laurens
4. THE GIRL WHO PLAYED WITH FIRE, by Stieg Larsson
5. 61 HOURS, by Lee Child Read More

Source: The New York Times - Best Sellers (Fri, 05 Nov 2010 01:26:35 GMT )
Top 5 at a Glance
1. THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO, by Stieg Larsson
2. THE GIRL WHO PLAYED WITH FIRE, by Stieg Larsson
3. THE FINKLER QUESTION, by Howard Jacobson
4. LITTLE BEE, by Chris Cleave
5. CUTTING FOR STONE, by Abraham Verghese Read More

Source: The New York Times - Best Sellers (Fri, 05 Nov 2010 01:25:44 GMT )
Top 5 at a Glance
1. LIFE, by Keith Richards with James Fox
2. BROKE, by Glenn Beck and Kevin Balfe
3. EARTH (THE BOOK), by Jon Stewart and others
4. THE LAST BOY, by Jane Leavy
5. AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF MARK TWAIN, VOL. 1, by Mark Twain Read More

Source: The New York Times - Best Sellers (Fri, 05 Nov 2010 01:24:49 GMT )
Top 5 at a Glance
1. THE CONFESSION, by John Grisham
2. WORTH DYING FOR, by Lee Child
3. AMERICAN ASSASSIN, by Vince Flynn
4. THE GIRL WHO KICKED THE HORNET’S NEST, by Stieg Larsson
5. SIDE JOBS, by Jim Butcher Read More

Source: The New York Times - Best Sellers (Fri, 05 Nov 2010 01:20:56 GMT )
0.5 stars out of 5: BOO-RING
It's hard out here for a ghost. Always having to think up new ways to scare suburban people in movies. You make the kids' toys come alive and play creepy music, and all the other ghosts hold up signs with straight 1.5s across the board. You're...
Read More

Read More

Source: Movies.com - Dave White Reviews (Sat, 23 May 2015 09:29:13 GMT )
2.5 stars out of 5: You can fly. Eventually.
In your initial visit to Tomorrowland, you're not really there at all. That's what scientifically-named Casey Newton (The Longest Ride's Britt Robertson) discovers when she first goes there by touching a tiny, metal, "T"-emblazoned pin. She takes...
Read More

Read More

Source: Movies.com - Dave White Reviews (Fri, 22 May 2015 05:11:54 GMT )
2.5 stars out of 5: A little much.
The past few years have seen a marked rise in the number of Christian-themed films getting wide theatrical distribution, but to call it a "new wave" of faith-based cinema is probably inappropriate. That designation is usually reserved for a...
Read More

Read More

Source: Movies.com - Dave White Reviews (Fri, 24 Apr 2015 23:27:52 GMT )
2.5 stars out of 5: Proustian mush
It begins with a shot of the Earth from space, and omniscient narration. (The voice of Hugh Ross, narrator of The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford, whose low-key, somewhat conspiratorial, post-sincere, NPR reporter tone turns...
Read More

Read More

Source: Movies.com - Dave White Reviews (Fri, 24 Apr 2015 23:25:37 GMT )
1.5 stars out of 5: History written by the winners.
First-time director Russell Crowe has stepped in it, probably without meaning to. But it's happening all the same. His film, entirely devoted to an exploration of the aftermath of a key, nation-defining battle in Australian war history -- the...
Read More

Read More

Source: Movies.com - Dave White Reviews (Fri, 24 Apr 2015 23:26:41 GMT )
3.5 stars out of 5: Much Avenge About More Things
They're building a giant machine now, a machine made of movies. To participate in the machine's agenda of taking your money, it will not help to begin by looking at this perpetual motion installment and working backwards, trying to catch up. You...
Read More

Read More

Source: Movies.com - Dave White Reviews (Fri, 01 May 2015 00:39:50 GMT )
2.5 stars out of 5: Songs about butts.
Pitch Perfect 2 begins with a crazy, performance-based, wardrobe malfunction, one that, in the film's words, exposes the "down under" region of one of the a cappella Bellas. For this accidental offense they are mocked, chastised, and stripped of...
Read More

Read More

Source: Movies.com - Dave White Reviews (Fri, 15 May 2015 05:04:29 GMT )


Search in globalheadlines.uk