Headlines from arround the world


CATEGORIES
Big News Network Big News Network
Big News Network - Business Big News Network - Business
Big News Network - Cities Big News Network - Cities
Big News Network - Countries Big News Network - Countries
Big News Network - Regions Big News Network - Regions
Big News Network - US States Big News Network - US States
BBC News BBC News
CNN CNN
Economy Economy
Europe Europe
Food & Nutrition Food & Nutrition
Health & Health Care Health & Health Care
Lifestyle Lifestyle
Mail Online Mail Online
Motoring Motoring
Other News Sources Other News Sources
Photography Photography
Science & Technology Science & Technology
Sports Sports
Sport - American Football Sport - American Football
Sport - Athletics Sport - Athletics
Sport - Baseball Sport - Baseball
Sport - Basketball Sport - Basketball
Sport - Car Racing Sport - Car Racing
Sport - Cricket Sport - Cricket
Sport - Football Sport - Football
Sport - Golf Sport - Golf
Sport - Hockey Sport - Hockey
Sport - Ice Hockey Sport - Ice Hockey
Sport - Sailing Sport - Sailing
Sport - Soccer Sport - Soccer
Sport - Rugby Sport - Rugby
Sport - Tennis Sport - Tennis
Reuters Reuters
The Adelaide Now The Adelaide Now
The Australian The Australian
The Daily Express The Daily Express
The Daily Telegraph The Daily Telegraph
The Guardian The Guardian
The Gazette The Gazette
The Herald Sun The Herald Sun
The Herald Sun Melbourne The Herald Sun Melbourne
The Independent The Independent
The Jerusalem Post The Jerusalem Post
The Jordan Times The Jordan Times
The Korea Herald The Korea Herald
The New York Times The New York Times
The New Zealand Herald The New Zealand Herald
The Perthnow The Perthnow
The Pravda The Pravda
The Sydney Morning Herald The Sydney Morning Herald
The Telegraph The Telegraph
The Times of India The Times of India
The Toronto Star The Toronto Star
The Wall Street Journal The Wall Street Journal
The Washington Post The Washington Post
Travel Travel
Typically Spanish Typically Spanish
USA TODAY USA TODAY
Yahoo World News Yahoo World News
CONTENT
FEATURED NEWS FEEDS


NEWS (LAST 200)
Man questioned by police after officers ...
Trump pushes Democrats to work with him ...
Artificial islands built in the Netherla...
Beauty blogger reveals DIY hair removal ...
Karina Vetrano murder suspect Chanel Lew...
I’m done procrastinating. This is not ...
Giuliani: Hush money payments to Stormy ...
Its a Christmas miracle - Lorraine Kelly...
The most beautiful rooms in New York Cit...
Faith Goldy ordered to pay Bell Media mo...
Goryon-San review
The mid-engined Dodge Viper that never w...
The Health 202: Trump and GOP say now is...
Google to invest $1 bn in new New York c...
More teens are vaping, but binge drinkin...
Turkey sees positive signals from US on ...
Melbourne United crush the ANBL-leading ...
Limited-edition $100,000 Lincoln Contine...
AP PHOTOS: 2018 a year of discord in Eur...
May defies Cabinet demands for MPs to ge...
N. Korean media touch on UNs move on its...
Putin calendar outselling all its rivals...
Businessman who left his injured and ble...
Lockerbie marks 30 years since deadly at...
Fury over video showing young Derby Coun...
Factbox: What do British politicians say...
Dinosaur footprints from more than 100 M...
Boy has unexpected spectator for his pia...
US School Violence Fast Facts
Olly Robbins in gaffe as he is pictured ...
Fire breaks out at Mumbai hospital, resc...
Jaguar workers next to suffer the fallou...
Ruth and Eamonn are slammed for dressing...
U.S. banks quietly pull back from riskie...
Millionaire jailed over girlfriends deat...
Solihull murders: Footage shows moments ...
Hotel cancels Christmas Day booking for ...
Vanuatu threatens to sue biggest carbon ...
Advent calendar 2018: Lizzy Yarnold beco...
Italian producers toast record prosecco ...
Sport24.co.za | Liverpool v Bayern, Man ...
NSW budget hit by $750 million GST write...
Jeff Bridges to receive Cecil B. DeMille...
Russian Effort to Influence 2016 Electio...
Federal Reserve rate decision could spar...
County lines Manchester gang jailed for ...
India five down in second innings, Austr...
‘One of a kind’ royal tomb i...
Saudi Arabia Denounces U.S. Senate’s R...
Doctor walks into patient room to emotio...
PICS: Bomb explodes outside private Gree...
11 dead after massive fire rips through ...
By the numbers: Why Los Angeles Rams are...
Father whose ex forged his signature on ...
Cars torched in the driveway of a Greenf...
Opinion: The evidence simply doesn’t s...
Orange is the New Black star Yael Stone ...
Scrunch test to tell if Christmas wrappi...
From bottom to top: bum bags enjoy surpr...
Burglar who made £100,000 haul disappea...
Van der Burgh grateful for happy ending ...
App Store Glitch Leads to Missing Rating...
Conor McGregor never spends money becaus...
We are the workers tasked with saving re...
Tolls go - but what next?
Turkey may start new military op in Syri...
Lionel Messi scores hat-trick and assist...
Liverpool star Xherdan Shaqiri has settl...
Rocky Fielding pays tribute after suffer...
Earthquake: 3.1 quake strikes near Mono ...
May says 2nd Brexit referendum would vio...
Seal pups at risk
For half-a-million dollars, a seat on th...
Arsenal boss Unai Emery admits January t...
Social media reaction to Man United bein...
Liverpool to take on Bayern Munich in Ch...
Russia meddled in all big social media i...
Ceasefire in Yemen’s Hodeida starts Tu...
Europa League draw LIVE - Arsenal vs BAT...
Severn bridge tolls: First lorry crosses...
Carly Ann Harris had psychosis during da...
Trailer loaded with whisky and gin stole...
Today: Help the Border Patrol — or the...
Racing! Wishing everyone happy holidays...
Bayern Munich stars Lewandowski and Humm...
BrainStorm gets FDA okay for stem cell t...
Champions League last 16: Runaway train ...
Android phone facial recognition securit...
Chelsea chairman Bruce Buck greets fans ...
Megan McKenna wows in silver jumpsuit as...
Champions League draw: Refreshing round-...
Tough 2019 for households
Sam Faiers accused of ripping off small ...
Darren Moore pub attack - five jailed...
Chelsea Europa League draw: Maurizio Sar...
Emirates to launch Scottish A380 service...
Mam wedi lladd ei merch oherwydd seicosi...
PES 2019 Is Now Free-To-Play (Sort Of)...
Music supervisors step into the spotligh...
Europa League last 32: Arsenal vs BATE,...
Pep Guardiola: Carabao Cup progress more...
Hedge fund moves at short end of U.S. cu...
Watch Bears lineman Charles Leno propose...
Climate change food calculator: Whats yo...
Roy Keane says some Manchester United pl...
Arsenal Europa League draw: Unai Emery&a...
WADA experts start inspecting Moscow ant...
Olympic short track champion gives tearf...
Original Tinker Bell to go on display at...
The Apprentice 2018 winner Sian Gabbidon...
UK MPs deny Brits will be warned not to ...
China to mark economic miracle that pull...
Jenna Dewan brings a springtime vibe to ...
Xiaomi told to be clearer after £1 phon...
Swedish Christmas gift guide: What to ge...
Brazilian police issue 20 different iden...
Raptors make a point that could be an ex...
Celtic face Valencia in Europa League ro...
Camerota goes off on Trumps SNL tweet...
Bayern relish tough cookie Liverpool in ...
How social media hyped nicotine for teen...
Offset crashes Cardi Bs show to apologiz...
Leigh Halfpenny: Scarlets back set for d...
Mike Van der Hoorn: Defender set for Swa...
DealBook Briefing: Corporate America Say...
Russia Used All Major Social Media Platf...
Kingdom Hearts 3s Final Trailer Is Heavy...
Rest easy with gear that simplifies your...
Liverpool stars enjoy New York themed Ch...
California Inc.: Is the Fed going to hik...
Kitchen Garden: Nourish your soul with d...
Poll results in tunnel wreath controvers...
Kelly McParland: Taverner can’t be an ...
The full scale of Russias meddling in 20...
Guy Martin pleads not guilty to having a...
Your letters for Dec. 17
These unusual baby names set to be BIG i...
Park in Mexico offers an immigrant exper...
The Philippines wins Miss Universe for a...
ANC mourns the deaths of KZN stalwarts M...
Jason Momoa doesnt regret early Game of ...
Netflix is testing an instant-replay fea...
Running Doc: How to recover from shin sp...
Multi-millionaire boss in High Court bat...
Siblings of five-year-old who was starve...
Traffic swerves to avoid hitting man who...
Labor would order workplace tribunal to ...
5-time champion Sevilla to play Lazio in...
Straight plays strike back amid a flood ...
Art Series Captures Taste And Color Of P...
Russia: Kremlin-backed candidate wins Fa...
U.S. diplomats hold talks with Taliban o...
Dog owner says a Pets At Home groomer ...
Cabinets urge May to pump billions of po...
Chelsea chairman meets fans after claims...
Nissan fails to agree Ghosn replacement,...
YouTube Rewind backlash sparks unofficia...
Collingham fire: School pays tribute to ...
Cardi B and Offset: When your ex doesnt ...
NSW budget hit by $750m GST write down o...
Hungarian MPs manhandled during protest...
Chelsea & Arsenal learn Europa League op...
Nigerian Pastoral Clashes Kill More Than...
Shopper slams PrettyLittleThing over a ...
Beyond Australian shores: Telstra plans ...
Your Daily Horoscope for Tuesday, Decemb...
While politicians refuse to act, Austral...
CBD Melbourne: Comrades layin down the l...
Uptopia to dystopia, my book club has be...
Turkey sees ‘positive’ signals from ...
Americans' message to Washington on...
New boss of Canberra Hospital here to st...
Senate report finds millions of social m...
U.S. Says Precision Airstrikes Killed 62...
Russian 2016 Influence Operation Targete...
Albanian illegal immigrant, 25, led poli...
Gambling firms hit with multi-million po...
Three-year-old Indian girl in critical c...
Sports Personality of the Year: outcry a...
Trump to review case of Matt Golsteyn, v...
Big-hearted pianist plays music for blin...
Couple told by doctors they would NEVER ...
Forgotten Women: The displaced Syrian mo...
More companies are turning to FOUR-DAY w...
Indian opposition leader jailed for life...
Futures dip as growth worries linger; Fe...
Boeing boosts value for Embraers commerc...
Teen left shocked when doctors tell her ...
Davis Cup: Sebastien Grosjean named Fran...
Turkey revives ghosts of Gezi protests a...
Shares in British retailers plunge after...
EU says no further Brexit talks happenin...
Google commences $1B expansion in New Yo...
The VERY simple scrunch test that determ...
Father of youth worker stabbed to death ...
Number of GPs retiring before 60 hits a ...
Are these the WORST Christmas presents e...
Googles $1B NYC investment shows its loo...
Mayor eyes overhauling racetrack without...
Roadside bombs hit police convoy in Egyp...

REVIEWS & PREVIEWS (LAST 60)
The Water Diviner Review
The Age of Adaline Review
Little Boy Review
Poltergeist Review
Tomorrowland Review
Hot Pursuit Review
The Avengers: Age of Ultron Review...
Pitch Perfect 2 Review
Mad Max: Fury Road Review
The D Train Review
Super Smash Bros. Ultimate Review - Me A...
Buying Guide: The best instant cameras...
Panasonic Lumix DC-ZS200 (Lumix DC-TZ200...
Samsung Galaxy S9+ Review
Live: Santigolds retro party
Domke F6 Little Bit Smaller shoulder bag...
Review: Power 106 FMs Powerhouse at Hond...
Review: Nickelback at Staples Center...
Live: The Clean stays youthful at the Ec...
Shaggy, Alison Hinds, Tarrus Riley shine...
Peak Design Capture Clip V3
Buying Guide: The best waterproof camera...
Van Halen at Staples Center: Arena rock ...
Review: The Petzi Treat Cam
The 10 Best Books of 2018
Pentax K-1 Mark II Review
Rhake waterproof backpack
Google Pixel 2 Review
Fujifilm X-H1 Review
LG G7 ThinQ review
Panasonic Lumix DC-LX100 II First impres...
Buying Guide: The best cameras under $15...
Buying Guide: The best cameras for begin...
Canon EOS M50 Review
Hex Raven DSLR Bag Review
DPReview Buying Guide: Best DSLRs of 201...
GoPro Fusion Review
Live: Lil Kim good, not quite great at K...
Review: Grimes, Grouplove and more at Ma...
Live: LMFAO has fun with debauchery...
Live: The Beach Boys at the Hollywood Bo...
Wandrd Prvke 21L Backpack
Alpine Labs Spark vs Miops Mobile Dongle...
Hasselblad X1D-50c Review
Fujifilm X-T100 Review
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 VI Review...
Review: Palette modular photo editing sy...
Tamron 70-210mm F4 Di VC USD Review...
Review: Grip Gear Movie Maker 2
Buying Guide: The best cameras for sport...
Panasonic Lumix DC-GX9 Review
Alien Skin Exposure X3 review
I yanked my boyfriends hand and crashed ...
How the Rams and Eagles match up in Week...
L.A. movie openings, Dec. 16-23: Mary Po...
Racing! Final day before racing takes a ...
Kings trying to stay positive after endi...
Loyola wins tourney title on three-point...
NFL roundup: Deshaun Watson, Texans rall...
Laguna Beach girls’ water polo shows o...


0.5 stars out of 5: BOO-RING
It's hard out here for a ghost. Always having to think up new ways to scare suburban people in movies. You make the kids' toys come alive and play creepy music, and all the other ghosts hold up signs with straight 1.5s across the board. You're...
Read More

Read More

Source: Movies.com - Dave White Reviews (Sat, 23 May 2015 09:29:13 GMT )
2.5 stars out of 5: You can fly. Eventually.
In your initial visit to Tomorrowland, you're not really there at all. That's what scientifically-named Casey Newton (The Longest Ride's Britt Robertson) discovers when she first goes there by touching a tiny, metal, "T"-emblazoned pin. She takes...
Read More

Read More

Source: Movies.com - Dave White Reviews (Fri, 22 May 2015 05:11:54 GMT )
2.5 stars out of 5: Songs about butts.
Pitch Perfect 2 begins with a crazy, performance-based, wardrobe malfunction, one that, in the film's words, exposes the "down under" region of one of the a cappella Bellas. For this accidental offense they are mocked, chastised, and stripped of...
Read More

Read More

Source: Movies.com - Dave White Reviews (Fri, 15 May 2015 05:04:29 GMT )
5.0 stars out of 5: Death to the patriarchy.
"Who killed the world?" yells a minor character in Mad Max: Fury Road. This outburst comes after an earlier moment where camera pauses on the question painted on a cave wall. And since it's one of only a couple dozen complete and comprehensible...
Read More

Read More

Source: Movies.com - Dave White Reviews (Fri, 15 May 2015 05:05:45 GMT )
1.0 stars out of 5: Stay home.
Although there is at least one earlier, less sexual, usage of the slang term "the d-train," referring to having a generalized bad experience, lately the expression has become more synonymous with the penis. That's because pop culture always needs...
Read More

Read More

Source: Movies.com - Dave White Reviews (Sat, 09 May 2015 01:33:01 GMT )
1.0 stars out of 5: Pursue a ticket to a different movie.
Allow me to mangle Tolstoy for a minute, and say that each good comedy is good in its own way, but that all bad comedies are alike. There's variation, of course, but they all limp along on sad, weak legs and confused direction. They're airless...
Read More

Read More

Source: Movies.com - Dave White Reviews (Fri, 08 May 2015 21:06:08 GMT )
3.5 stars out of 5: Much Avenge About More Things
They're building a giant machine now, a machine made of movies. To participate in the machine's agenda of taking your money, it will not help to begin by looking at this perpetual motion installment and working backwards, trying to catch up. You...
Read More

Read More

Source: Movies.com - Dave White Reviews (Fri, 01 May 2015 00:39:50 GMT )
1.5 stars out of 5: History written by the winners.
First-time director Russell Crowe has stepped in it, probably without meaning to. But it's happening all the same. His film, entirely devoted to an exploration of the aftermath of a key, nation-defining battle in Australian war history -- the...
Read More

Read More

Source: Movies.com - Dave White Reviews (Fri, 24 Apr 2015 23:26:41 GMT )
2.5 stars out of 5: Proustian mush
It begins with a shot of the Earth from space, and omniscient narration. (The voice of Hugh Ross, narrator of The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford, whose low-key, somewhat conspiratorial, post-sincere, NPR reporter tone turns...
Read More

Read More

Source: Movies.com - Dave White Reviews (Fri, 24 Apr 2015 23:25:37 GMT )
2.5 stars out of 5: A little much.
The past few years have seen a marked rise in the number of Christian-themed films getting wide theatrical distribution, but to call it a "new wave" of faith-based cinema is probably inappropriate. That designation is usually reserved for a...
Read More

Read More

Source: Movies.com - Dave White Reviews (Fri, 24 Apr 2015 23:27:52 GMT )

The idea of what the Super Smash Bros. games are, and what they can be, has been different things during the series' 20-year history. What began as an accessible multiplayer game also became a highly competitive one-on-one game. But it's also been noted for having a comprehensive single-player adventure, as well as becoming a sort of virtual museum catalog, exhibiting knowledge and audiovisual artifacts from the histories of its increasingly diverse crossover cast. Ultimate embraces all these aspects, and each has been notably refined, added to, and improved for the better. Everyone, and basically everything, from previous games is here--all existing characters, nearly all existing stages, along with the flexibility to play and enjoy those things in different ways. Super Smash Bros. Ultimate is a comprehensive, considered, and charming package that builds on an already strong and enduring fighting system.

If you've ever spent time with a Smash game, then you likely have a good idea of how Ultimate works. Competing players deal damage to their opponents in order to more easily knock them off the stage. The controls remain relatively approachable for a competitive combat game; three different buttons in tandem with basic directional movements are all you need to access a character's variety of attacks and special abilities. There are a large variety of items and power-ups to mix things up (if you want to) and interesting, dynamic stages to fight on (also if you want to). You can find complexities past this, of course--once you quickly experience the breadth of a character's skillset, it allows you to begin thinking about the nuances of a fight (again, if you want to). Thinking about optimal positioning, figuring out what attacks can easily combo off of another, working out what the best move for each situation is, and playing mind games with your human opponents can quickly become considerations, and the allure of Smash as a fighting game is how easy it is to reach that stage.

No Caption Provided
Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

Complexity also comes with the wide variety of techniques afforded by Ultimate's staggeringly large roster of over 70 characters. Smash's continuing accessibility is a fortunate trait in this regard, because once you understand the basic idea of how to control a character, many of the barriers to trying out a completely new one are gone. Every fighter who has appeared in the previous four Smash games is here, along with some brand-new ones, and the presence of so many diverse and unorthodox styles to both wield and compete against is just as attractive as the presence of the characters themselves. In fact, it's still astounding that a game featuring characters from Mario Bros, Sonic The Hedgehog, Pac-Man, Metal Gear Solid, Final Fantasy, and Street Fighter all interacting with each other actually exists.

On a more technical level, Ultimate makes a number of under-the-hood alterations that, at this early stage, seem like positive changes that make Smash feel noticeably faster and more exciting to both watch and play. Characters take more damage in one-on-one fights; continuous dodging is punished with increased vulnerability; fighters can perform any ground-based attack, including smash moves, immediately out of a running state; and short-hop aerial attacks (previously a moderately demanding technique) can be easily performed by pressing two buttons simultaneously. Refinements like these might go unnoticed by most, but they help define Ultimate's core gameplay as a tangible evolution of the series' core mechanics.

A number of Ultimate's more superficial changes also help Smash's general quality-of-life experience, too. Some make it a more readable game--additions to the UI communicate previously hidden elements like meter charges and Villager's captured items, a simple radar helps keep track of characters off-screen, and a slow motion, zoom-in visual effect when critical hits connect make these moments more exciting to watch. Other changes help streamline the core multiplayer experience and add compelling options. Match rules can now be pre-defined with a swath of modifiers and saved for quick selection later. Stage selection occurs before character selection, so you can make more informed decisions on which fighter to use.

On top of a built-in tournament bracket mode, Ultimate also features a number of additional Smash styles. Super Sudden Death returns, as does Custom Smash, which allows you to create matches with wacky modifiers. Squad Strike is a personal favorite, which allows you to play 3v3 or 5v5 tag-team battles (think King of Fighters), and Smashdown is a great, engaging mode that makes the most of the game's large roster by disqualifying characters that have already been used as a series of matches continues, challenging your ability to do well with characters who you might not be familiar with.

The most significant addition to Ultimate, however, lies in its single-player content. Ultimate once again features a Classic Mode where each individual fighter has their own unique ladder of opponents to defeat, but the bigger deal is World of Light, Ultimate's surprisingly substantial RPG-style campaign. It's a convoluted setup--beginning as Kirby, you go on a long journey throughout a huge world map to rescue Smash's other fighters (who have incidentally been cloned in large numbers) from the big bad's control. Along the way, you'll do battles with Spirits, characters hailing from other video games that, while not directly engaging in combat, have taken control of clones, altered them in their images, and unleashed them on you.

Though there is some light puzzling, the world is naturally filled with hundreds upon hundreds of fights--there are over 1200 Spirit characters, and the vast majority have their own unique battle stages that use the game's match variables to represent their essence. The Goomba Spirit, for example, will put you up against an army of tiny Donkey Kongs. Meanwhile, the Excitebike Spirit might throw three Warios at you who only use their Side+B motorbike attacks.

No Caption Provided
Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

It may seem like a tenuous idea at first, but these fights are incredibly entertaining. It's hard not to appreciate the creativity of using Smash's assets to represent a thousand different characters. Zero Suit Samus might stand in for a battle with The Boss from Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater by donning a silver-palette costume and fighting you in a flower-filled Final Destination, but she also stands in for the spirit of Alexandra Roivas from Eternal Darkness by using a black-palette costume and fighting you in the haunted Luigi's Mansion stage, with a modifier that makes the screen occasionally flip upside down (Eternal Darkness was a GameCube horror game whose signature feature were "Sanity Effects", which skewed the game in spooky ways to represent the character's loosening grip on reality). If I knew the character, I often found myself thinking about how clever their Spirit battle was.

Defeating a Spirit will add it to your collection, and Spirits also act as World of Light's RPG system. There are two types of Spirit: Primary and Support. Primary Spirits have their own power number and can be leveled up through various means to help make your actual fighter stronger. Primary Spirits also have one of four associated classes, which determine combat effectiveness in a rock-scissors-paper-style system. These are both major considerations to take into account before a battle, and making sure you're not going into a fight at a massive disadvantage adds a nice dimension to the amusing unpredictability of this mode. What you also need to take into account are the modifiers that might be enabled on each stage, which is where Support Spirits come in. They can be attached to Primary Spirits in a limited quantity and can mitigate the effect of things like poisonous floors, pitch-black stages, or reversed controls, or they can simply buff certain attacks.

There are a few Spirit fights that can be frustrating, however. Stages that are a 1v4 pile-on are downright annoying, despite how well-equipped you might be, as are stages where you compete against powerful assist trophies. On the flip side, once you find yourself towards the end of the campaign, there are certain loadouts that can trivialize most stages, earning you victory in less than a second. Regardless, there's a compulsive quality to collecting Spirits, and not just because they might make you stronger. It's exciting to see which obscure character you run into next, feel validated for recognizing them, and see how the game interprets them in a Spirit battle. There's also just a superficial joy to collecting, say, the complete Elite Beat Agents cast (Osu! Takatae! Ouendan characters are here too), even though these trophies lack the frills of previous Smash games.

No Caption Provided
Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

Some hubs in the World of Light map are also themed around certain games and bundle related Spirits together to great effect--Dracula's Castle from Castlevania, which changes the map into a 2D side-scroller, and the globe from Street Fighter II, complete with the iconic airplane noises, are personal standouts. Despite the dramatic overtones of World of Spirit's setup, the homages you find within it feel like a nice commemoration of the games and characters without feeling like a pandering nostalgia play. One of the most rewarding homages of all, however, lies in Ultimate's huge library of video game music. Over 800 tracks, which include originals as well as fantastic new arrangements, can all be set as stage soundtracks as well enjoyed through the game's music player.

There is one significant struggle that Ultimate comes up against, however, which lies in the nature of the console itself. Playing Super Smash Bros. Ultimate in the Switch's handheld mode is simply not a great experience. In situations where there are more than two characters on screen, the view of the action often becomes too wide, making the fighters too small to see properly, and it can be difficult to tell what you or your opponent is doing. The game's penchant for flashy special effects and busy, colorful stages doesn't help things at all, and unless you're playing a one-on-one match, you'll likely suffer some blameless losses. This is a situational disadvantage and may not affect all players, but it puts a damper on the idea of Smash on the go.

The need to unlock characters also has the potential to be an initial annoyance, especially if your goal is to jump straight into multiplayer and start learning one of the six brand-new characters. In my time with the game, I split my attention between playing World of Light (where rescuing characters unlocks them everywhere) and multiplayer matches, where the constant drip-feed of "New Challenger" unlock opportunities (which you can easily retry if you fail) came regularly. I naturally earned the entire roster in roughly 10 hours of playtime, but your mileage may vary.

Your mileage may also vary in Ultimate's online mode, where the experience of competing against others was inconsistent during the 200+ matches we played. Ultimate matches you with players from your region, but continues to use peer-to-peer style connectivity, which means the quality of the experience relies primarily on the strength of each player's internet connection. A bad connection from any player can result in a noticeable input delay, stuttering, and even freezing as the game tries to deal with latency issues. Things have the greatest potential to go bad during four-player matches, where there's a greater chance of finding a weak link.

There's some blame to be put on the console itself--the Switch only has the capabilities for wifi networking. You can invest in an optional USB LAN adapter to make sure your own connection is stable, but because of the peer-to-peer nature, I found that the experience was just as inconsistent. You can get lucky--I would regularly enjoy sessions filled with smooth matches--but regardless, laggy matches aren't exactly a rare occurrence. It's also worth noting that you're required to have a paid subscription to Nintendo's Switch Online service to be able to play online at all, so the sub-optimal performance of the mode is disappointing.

Network performance aside, Ultimate's online mode does have an interesting way to cater to the large variety of ways to play Smash Bros. You can create public or private arenas for friends and strangers, which serve as personal rooms to dictate specific rulesets, but the primary mode is Quick Play, where you're matched against people of a similar skill level to you. Quick Play features an option where you can set your preferred ruleset--things like the number of players, item availability, win conditions--and it will try to match you up with someone with similar preferences. However, Ultimate also prioritizes getting you into a match in under a minute, which is great, but sometimes means that you might find yourself playing a completely different style of match.

No Caption Provided
Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

In my experience, I found that there were enough people who wanted to play with my ruleset (one-on-one, three stock, six minutes, no items, Omega stages only) and I would find myself in these kinds of matches, or at least a very close approximation, the majority of the time. Getting thrown into the occasional four-player free-for-all felt like a nice, refreshing change of pace to me, but depending on how flexible you are as a player, this can be a turn-off. But like so much of Ultimate, its multitude of options and styles of play doesn't necessarily mean that all of them will suit every player.

An inconsistent online mode and situational downers don't stop Super Smash Bros. Ultimate from shining as a flexible multiplayer game that can be as freewheeling or as firm as you want it to be. Its entertaining single-player content helps keep the game rich with interesting things to do, as well as bolstering its spirit of loving homage to the games that have graced Nintendo consoles. Ultimate's diverse content is compelling, its strong mechanics are refined, and the encompassing collection is simply superb.

Read More

Source: GameSpot - Reviews (Thu, 06 Dec 2018 05:00:00 -0800)
The editors of The Times Book Review choose the best fiction and nonfiction titles this year. Read More

Source: The New York Times - Sunday Review (Fri, 30 Nov 2018 17:14:15 GMT )
Van Halen returned to Los Angeles to perform to a hometown crowd at the Staples Center, where band members David Lee Roth, and Eddie, Alex, and Wolfgang Van Halen performed during their "Different Kind of Truth" reunion tour. Times pop music critic Randall Roberts says the performance was often lackluster. Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Pop Concert Reviews ( Sat, 02 Jun 2012 12:49:42 -0700 )
The New Zealand band the Clean has been around a long time but still packs energy, especially when it performs ‘Tally Ho.’ Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Pop Concert Reviews ( Thu, 31 May 2012 14:57:42 -0700 )
On day two of UCLA's annual JazzReggae Festival, Shaggy, Tarrus Riley, Collie Buddz, Alison Hinds and others showcased the many sounds of the Caribbean, from soca and reggae to reggaeton and lovers rock. Times pop music critic Randall Roberts offers an overview of the day. Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Pop Concert Reviews ( Tue, 29 May 2012 12:25:57 -0700 )
If you closed your eyes during the sold-out Santigold concert at Club Nokia Friday night -- especially at any point in the first half -- it’d have been easy to feel like you were at one of the Hollywood Bowl’s annual flashback concerts featuring ‘80s British bands. Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Pop Concert Reviews ( Sat, 02 Jun 2012 13:49:57 -0700 )
Power 106 FM kept its annual summer hip-hop show, Powerhouse, old school and relatively orthodox, with rappers Snoop Dogg, T.I. and Young Jeezy leading a show that was light on the dance-oriented pop hits that dominate the airwaves. The Times' August Brown reviews. Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Pop Concert Reviews (Sun, 24 Jun 2012 17:40:41 -0700 )
Nickelback has no official connection to the big-screen version of “Rock of Ages,” but on Friday night at Staples Center, it was hard not to think of the just-opened movie musical -- a flashy-trashy dramatization of the 1980s hard-rock scene... Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Pop Concert Reviews ( Sun, 17 Jun 2012 19:36:33 -0700 )
Now in its fifth year, Make Music Pasadena celebrates music at its most casual and community-focused, and has grown from a festival that once largely featured intimate, acoustic appearances in storefronts to one that can draw artists with national appeal. Boasting 149 performances and pop-up stages on Old Town's Colorado Boulevard and the Playhouse District's Madison Avenue, Make Music Pasadena is a large-scale event done on a budget. Ninety-nine percent of the artists appearing do not get paid, say organizers, and headliners such as electronic artist Grimes and peppy local rockers Grouplove were expected to bring at least 20,000 people to downtown Pasadena. Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Pop Concert Reviews ( Sun, 17 Jun 2012 17:39:47 -0700 )
Live: Lil Kim driven to give till it hurts: The hip-hop diva's ambitious if erratic show was almost too much for the compact confines of Key Club. Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Pop Concert Reviews ( Thu, 14 Jun 2012 17:51:14 -0700 )
LMFAO's Redfoo and Sky Blu stay in character and play debauchery for laughs and fun at Staples Center as part of Sorry for Party Rocking Tour. Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Pop Concert Reviews ( Wed, 06 Jun 2012 18:34:01 -0700 )
The Beach Boys reunited June 2, 2012, at the Hollywood Bowl for the band's first tour together in more than two decades. A review for the Los Angeles Times. Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Pop Concert Reviews ( Sun, 03 Jun 2012 13:21:26 -0700 )
Read More

Source: Depreview - All Reviews & Previews (Mon, 30 Jul 2018 13:00:00 Z)

Like many kids of my generation, I was raised consuming a plethora of cable news nightmares — children getting into that questionable van, women trusting that questionable man. The bad things people do to one another, cut into 20-second segments designed to send fear through your heart just before...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews ( Sun, 16 Dec 2018 05:00:00 PST )

Hello, my name is John Cherwa, and welcome back to our horse racing newsletter as we have another handicapping lesson from Rob Henie.

The other day, we proposed changing the takeout of Santa Anita’s new roulette bet from 15.43% to 5.26%, which mirrored the house edge in double-green casino roulette....

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sun, 16 Dec 2018 05:00:00 PST )

Rams (11-2) vs. Philadelphia (6-7)

When Rams have the ball

Jared Goff’s efficiency took a dive the last two games, but the third-year quarterback and coach Sean McVay aren’t in panic mode. Goff is completing 64% of his passes, 27 for touchdowns, with 11 interceptions. Until last week’s four-pick...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sun, 16 Dec 2018 05:00:00 PST )
Dec. 17

They Shall Not Grow Old

Filmmaker Peter Jackson takes a look back at World War I in this documentary featuring rare archival footage. (1:39) R.

Dec. 19

Mary Poppins Returns

Emily Blunt is the magical supercalifragilisticexpialidocious nanny in this musical sequel to the 1964 film. With...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Movie Reviews (Sun, 16 Dec 2018 05:00:00 PST )

The blade end of the stick that Drew Doughty two-hand smashed into the crossbar sat in front of the Kings’ net as the Pittsburgh Penguins celebrated. Jonathan Quick made his way to the bench fuming.

It didn’t end there.

Doughty paced in a vacant corridor of PPG Paints Arena postgame, presumably...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sat, 15 Dec 2018 20:50:00 PST )

Deshaun Watson threw a 14-yard touchdown pass to DeAndre Hopkins with 2:15 left, lifting the Houston Texans to a 29-22 comeback victory over Sam Darnold and the New York Jets on Saturday night.

After Darnold and Jets took their first lead of the game on Elijah McGuire's 2-yard touchdown run, Watson...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews ( Sat, 15 Dec 2018 20:45:00 PST )

Early in the season, coach Ethan Damato said the Laguna Beach High girls’ water polo team does not have a set starting lineup.

This might seem unusual for the Breakers, the top-ranked team in CIF Southern Section Division 1 and 2. What is actually unusual is the depth that Laguna Beach has, which...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sat, 15 Dec 2018 16:40:00 PST )

Their faces were grim, but with their voices united in a common cause, Vietnamese Americans rallied in Little Saigon on Saturday to protest the Trump administration’s push to deport thousands of war refugees.

“We stay together,” and “Pho-get Trump,” they shouted, carrying signs and sharing photos...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sat, 15 Dec 2018 16:50:00 PST )

Deshaun Watson threw a 14-yard touchdown pass to DeAndre Hopkins with 2:15 left, lifting the Houston Texans to a 29-22 comeback victory over Sam Darnold and the New York Jets on Saturday night.

After Darnold and Jets took their first lead of the game on Elijah McGuire's 2-yard touchdown run, Watson...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sat, 15 Dec 2018 17:00:00 PST )
The former first lady’s long-awaited new memoir recounts with insight, candor and wit her family’s trajectory from the Jim Crow South to Chicago’s South Side and her own improbable journey from there to the White House. Read More

Source: The New York Times - Sunday Review (Mon, 10 Dec 2018 16:08:22 GMT )

After eight years of trying, Republicans may finally have found a way to kill the Affordable Care Act. On Friday, a conservative federal judge in Texas responsible for several oddball rulings declared the entirety of Obamacare to be unconstitutional. By handing a victory to 18 Republican state...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sat, 15 Dec 2018 14:50:00 PST )
'Clara's Ghost'

About halfway through the psychodrama “Clara’s Ghost,” the emotionally fragile Clara Reynolds — played by Paula Niedert Elliott — is squirming through dinner with her needy, competitive daughters and husband, when she slowly scrapes a long fingernail against the table, until it...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Movie Reviews (Wed, 5 Dec 2018 13:25:00 PST )

The Galaxy entered December without a general manager, a full-time coach or any public assurances that Zlatan Ibrahimovic, their best player, would be back next season.

The team crossed two of those things off its to-do list last week. But it was the one thing that didn’t get done that best shows...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sat, 15 Dec 2018 16:00:00 PST )

Telling a story of the cyclical nature of light and dark and possessing both stamina-focused combat and larger-than-life bosses, Ashen is easy to compare to From Software's Dark Souls. However, Ashen establishes its own identity by delivering an experience that focuses on creating a sense of community and trust with those you meet. The weapon system can occasionally take away from some of the more strategic elements of the game's combat when playing solo, but Ashen still delivers an incredible adventure, regardless if you play by yourself or with others.

In Ashen, you start as a nameless nobody listening to the origin of your world, its three races, and how everything became blanketed in darkness after the disappearance of the Ashen--a god-like figure of immense power. When a sudden explosion briefly brings light back to the land, allowing everyone to see clearly for the first time in years, it sparks a search for the Ashen in hopes its return will push the last vestiges of darkness away. Leading the charge, you take over a bandit camp and transform it into an outpost called Vagrant's Rest. From there, you set out into the world in search of people to join your new home, as well as a means of finding the Ashen.

Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

Your journey takes you from one fast travel point to the next within an interconnected series of open environments, and you'll find a diverse assortment of enemies along the way. Caverns and dilapidated castles entice you to explore off the beaten path and enjoy lengthy expeditions for hidden weapons, armor, and treasure. You'll need to sprint and jump your way through most of it at the start, but Ashen's controls are fairly tight and ledge grabs ensure you safely recover most of the time. It never feels like you're unfairly leaping to your death over and over again, and unlocking a fun new navigational ability halfway through the game will see you returning to old locales to search for secrets you couldn't leap to before.

There are very few options for long-range combat in Ashen so for the most part, you're in the thick of things with your opponents and trying to out maneuver each other. Attacking, defending, and dodging all use different amounts of stamina, and carefully managing how much you have left is key to survival. If you've played a good Souls-like game before, Ashen works exactly as you would expect. The controls produce a methodical approach to combat that's enjoyable to just lose yourself in.

On your travels, you'll recruit characters and send them back to Vagrant's Rest to set up shop, where you can interact with them again for side quests and special items. Most will even join you on your adventure whenever you exit camp, aiding you in combat and reviving you if you happen to fall. They can also help with exploration, too, as dungeon doors require two people to open and some ledges can only be reached if a team boosts each other up. As more people join Vagrant's Rest and you complete more quests for them, your settlement will grow. Roads are paved, structures are built, and the community becomes a thriving town. You can't manage how Vagrant's Rest grows, unfortunately, but there are fun little nods to the quests you undergo. Vorsa wears an outfit composed of the pelts from the animals you hunted for her, for example, and Eila constructs a dock so you can ride down the nearby river in a barrel--an activity she speaks of when you first meet her. In a game where enemies are constantly respawning, it's incredibly fulfilling to see your hard work actually having a permanent impact on your corner of the world.

You can forge relationships with other players, too. If you play Ashen online, you enter a shared world where you can encounter people. Other players will appear as the NPCs you've recruited to Vagrant's Rest, and whether or not you choose to interact with them is up to you. With no voice chat, actions define a person's character, and this can form powerful bonds that last for the entire game. For example, seeing a player-controlled Jokell silently step in front of my character and take a spear to the chest when I had a sliver of health has, for me, left a long-standing positive impression for the pipe-smoking explorer. I brought a computer-controlled Jokell along with me every chance I had after that, cheering for him when he did something incredible and dropping everything to revive him when he fell. It's a rather simple example of transference at work when all is said and done, but it's remarkably effective at creating trust (and I imagine distrust in some cases) with the characters you meet.

No Caption Provided
Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

If working with others isn't really your thing, you can play offline with NPCs or use an early game item that allows you to play completely solo. It certainly ups Ashen's difficulty to play without others and it creates a more traditional Souls-like experience. However, the greater challenge of playing completely by yourself isn't worth losing out on the misadventures you find yourself in when traveling with another character. Even if you play offline with computer-controlled characters, you'll still form bonds with a one or two of them, and that improves Ashen's entire experience. If you really want that greater challenge, there's a mode that lowers your max health and stamina, which is a much better way of making the game harder.

There is one unfortunate wrinkle that becomes apparent when playing with computer-controlled characters, however, and it has to do with Ashen's weapons. Weapons can be one of three types--axe, club/hammer, or spear--but tools from the same class can attack very differently. Some axes use a leaping vertical slam animation that allow you to get the jump on your enemy before they react, while others have a horizontal slash that can more easily hit multiple targets, for example. This adds additional levels of battle strategy other than simply picking whatever in your inventory is strongest. Problems arise when you're playing with NPCs though, as you're unable to choose which weapon a computer-controlled character brings into battle. Pretty much every enemy in Ashen can be tackled with whatever weapon you want, but there are a few locations and one boss battle where a weapon's animation speed has a pretty substantial effect on you and your partner's chances of survival. Not having the choice to pick your partner's weapon introduces an unfortunate element of luck into some battles that should be entirely based on skill. It rarely happens, but it's noticeable when it does.

Despite how you play, boss battles are where most of your deaths are probably going to come from, as each are five- to 15-minute affairs that push you to constantly adapt on the fly. No two bosses behave the same way, and many have a gimmick that can transform the fight. For example, one of the mid-game bosses is a staff-wielding giant woman who uses her magical lantern to deliver devastatingly powerful area-of-effect attacks and buff her health. If you put some distance between the two of you, you can bait her into throwing her lantern at you in frustration and then destroy it. Doing so allows you to carve out larger chunks of her health, but she goes into a violent frenzy and starts attacking you differently once her precious lantern is destroyed. It's up to you whether or not you destroy the lantern, and when you'll do it if you decide to do so.

No Caption Provided
Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

In some cases, like this example, finding a boss' gimmick makes the battle much easier, but it can also just change how it plays out--which is a wonderful thing for any fight you're struggling with. Instead of feeling like you need to implement the same strategy over and over against every boss and just do it better, you're occasionally rewarded for experimenting and trying something new. It helps dull any frustration that might arise from repeatedly losing to the same foe, too.

Ashen does more than enough to differentiate it from other Souls-like games. Although its combat utilizes the same stamina-focused mechanics, the inclusion of features that promote a sense of community with the game's characters makes for a wholly different experience. It's frustrating to spawn and see that your computer-controlled partner has a weapon that doesn't complement the one you're using. However, even when playing with NPCs, your allies' efforts to assist you in battle cause you to care about the fates of the colorful cast of people you meet on your journey. The relationships you forge define your adventure through Ashen, and helping your new friends is a powerful motivator that drives you forward through the game's beautiful world.

Read More

Source: GameSpot - Reviews (Thu, 06 Dec 2018 21:00:00 -0800)

Earth Defense Force 5 is a clear culmination point for a series that’s been around since the PlayStation 2, reaching a scale that could surprise even the most hardened of EDF veterans. While it retains many of the familiar tropes from the franchise--four player classes, a huge variety of missions, unlockable weapons and items, and obscenely terrible in-game dialogue that's so bad it’s good--EDF 5 ratchets everything up to 11 and remarkably pulls it off. With bullet-hell style action and massive, open battlefields where every building is destructible, it feels like there’s no better time to get out there and save the world from rampaging space insects and their alien masters.

You play a nameless civilian who gets caught up in the invasion as the giant bugs start pummeling an EDF outpost. As you emerge from the underground base the scale of the attack becomes apparent, with you eventually joining the EDF and rising through the ranks to become Earth’s best hope for survival. It’s a fun, if typical, premise that plays out through the cheesiest in-game dialogue I’ve ever heard. It takes numerous hard turns, culminating in one of the most outlandish and audacious boss fights imaginable. Watching the story weave as it tries to connect the dots is like watching a slow motion trainwreck you cannot take your eyes away from--it’s so brash and ridiculous that you can’t help be charmed by it. Though while the dialogue and story can have you gritting your teeth at the levels of cringe, the action is something else entirely.

Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

Before getting out onto the battlefield, you’re given a choice of playing through each mission with one of four character types, each with different play styles and their own customisable loadouts. The Ranger is the stock standard soldier type and by far the easiest to use in direct combat, while the Wing Diver is fast, good for close combat, and can fly herself out of dangerous situations. While you can play through any missions as any player type, some choices certainly made for an easier time than others. Choosing an Air Raider, a character who can request long-range cannon fire and vehicle drops, for an underground mission isn’t the best use of its skills. But the game will let you do it anyway, happily letting you test things out and work it out for yourself. Loading times are quick, so if you make a poor choice of loadout, it’s only a quick hop back to the menu to change it up before getting back out there.

Fighting the alien hordes can be a completely overwhelming experience. The scale of everything is imposing, especially when faced with a swarm of very angry bugs that are clawing and climbing over not just themselves but apartment buildings, factories, and homes to get at you. The maps are huge, giving you a wide playspace to enact your destruction, and for the most part they use that scale and space well. Calling in a bombing run as an Air Raider will zoom the camera out to show a wide shot of the area, with the sky lighting up bright orange as the bombs carpet the landing zone. Various vehicles like tanks and armored suits can be called in or found scattered around, and although they can feel pretty loose and unwieldy at the best of times, they are at least a good way to move from one side of the map to another or to put some space between yourself and the horde.

Player movement also feels a little sloppy. Moving from a standard run into a dash feels more cumbersome than it should, as does general running about. Thankfully, aiming feels snappy and tight, so regardless of whether you’re in tight space or out on a mountain overlooking a wide-open beachside, combat always feels more rewarding than not.

Replayability is encouraged through battle. As you chew through swarms of giant ants, spiders, carpet bugs and more, blasting them apart in a flurry of brightly-colored blood and chunks, and downed enemies will drop armor as well as weapon and health pickups. While the health pickups heal both you and your nearby AI allies--who you can find out in the battlefield and enlist under your supervision--weapon and armor pickups both manifest after the mission is over, giving you access to new and upgraded weaponry and a higher base HP number respectively. The difficulty level you play will also influence your rewards, with higher difficulties giving you stronger weapons with higher base stats, encouraging you to come back on a higher difficulty level to grind out better gear.

No Caption Provided
Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

Although the offline single player is fun, EDF 5 and the differing play styles of each character type really come into their own in the cooperative multiplayer, where up to four people can join together and take on the entirety of the 110-mission-long campaign. Although offline and online campaign progress is separated, which annoyingly means you’ll need to play through the missions twice to unlock and access them in each, blasting through aliens with others takes the core gameplay to a new level. In one session, my Wing Diver went down while I was standing atop a large tower while attacking a mob of giant hornets. My co-op partner couldn’t reach me to revive me and instead resorted to destroying the tower, bringing me down with it so I could then be revived. Similarly, a guided missile weapon they were using as a Ranger took on a whole new level of lethality when combined with my laser sight to guide it for them, increasing its range far beyond its normal capability. Classes are balanced so they can helpfully support each other in unique ways, which you simply don’t get in the single-player mode where everything is put squarely on your shoulders.

For everything that’s happening on screen, with bullets, missiles, bodies and debris flying every which way, you might expect EDF 5 to experience frame drops on occasion. But only once did performance slow to crawl during an especially busy scene involving a mothership, a crumbling city, hundreds of enemies and a rainstorm. Some of the grimier textures and character models give it a dated look, though while it’s not the best-looking game around, it has the headroom to handle the sheer volume of things happening around you without severe performance hits when the action gets out of hand.

Despite the series' long-running nature, Earth Defense Force 5 is a standout action game, revelling in its own absurdity while crafting a brilliantly fun and lively action game around it. Its huge battles are a joy to watch play out both from up close and afar, and the wide variety of weapons and play styles with each player type offers plenty of reason to come back for more after the final bullet has been fired.

Read More

Source: GameSpot - Reviews (Fri, 07 Dec 2018 03:00:00 -0800)
Read More

Source: Depreview - All Reviews & Previews (Mon, 19 Nov 2018 14:57:00 Z)
Read More

Source: Depreview - All Reviews & Previews (Mon, 23 Apr 2018 13:57:00 Z)

After eight years of trying, Republicans may finally have found a way to kill the Affordable Care Act. On Friday, a conservative federal judge in Texas responsible for several oddball rulings declared the entirety of Obamacare to be unconstitutional. By handing a victory to 18 Republican state...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sat, 15 Dec 2018 14:50:00 PST )

Whether migrants survive the treacherous desert trek that many take to enter the United States can come down to one crucial factor: the availability of water.

Dehydration is thought to be one of the biggest killers of the hundreds of people who die attempting the journey each year.

The tragic demise...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sat, 15 Dec 2018 15:05:00 PST )

Thousands of teachers, students and union allies marched through downtown Los Angeles on Saturday, from City Hall to the Broad Museum, a month ahead of a possible strike that L.A. educators have threatened if Los Angeles Unified doesn’t meet demands that include retroactive raises, smaller class...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sat, 15 Dec 2018 13:40:00 PST )

A little bit of controversy. A little bit of Broadway. A little bit of Zubin Mehta. I’m Carolina A. Miranda, staff writer for the Los Angeles Times, with the week’s essential arts stories.

MURAL CONTROVERSY

Los Angeles Unified School District officials have announced that a mural by Beau Stanton...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sat, 15 Dec 2018 10:50:00 PST )

A Carlsbad priest accused of groping a seminary student’s groin twice in a restroom stall during a night of heavy drinking testified this week that he was merely trying to put pressure on the man’s stomach to help with vomiting.

The Rev. Juan Garcia Castillo’s testimony Friday came during the third...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sat, 15 Dec 2018 12:45:00 PST )

Disney Channel has severed ties with “Andi Mack” actor Stoney Westmoreland following his Friday arrest in Utah on suspicion of arranging a sexual liaison with a minor.

“Given the nature of the charges and our responsibility for the welfare of employed minors, we have released him from his recurring...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sat, 15 Dec 2018 11:40:00 PST )

After failing to accomplish the task in Week 14 at Chicago, the Rams once again have the opportunity to clinch a bye through the wild-card round of the playoffs.

And history, at least what qualifies as such during Sean McVay’s near two seasons as the Rams coach, suggests the Rams will reach their...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sat, 15 Dec 2018 12:05:00 PST )

They lined up for hours in the woody grounds of the former presidential compound to see a movie — not just any film — but “Roma,” Alfonso Cuaron’s autobiographical reverie, named after the shabby-chic Mexico City neighborhood where the director was reared.

With some breathless reviewers already...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sat, 15 Dec 2018 12:00:00 PST )

The greatest player in the history of the NBA is immortalized with a statue that sits outside United Center. Six NBA Finals wins are celebrated on banners that hang from the building’s rafters and behind glass cases in the concourse.

The player introductions are iconic, the uniforms are classics...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sat, 15 Dec 2018 11:55:00 PST )

More than 130 million Americans are waking up this Saturday morning to the news that their health coverage has been thrown into doubt.

That’s because, late Friday night, a federal judge in Texas ruled that the Affordable Care Act — including its exchange health plans, Medicaid expansion and its...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Sat, 15 Dec 2018 08:40:00 PST )

To the editor: What a stupid decision by the L.A. County Board of Supervisors to approve construction of the 19,000-home Centennial development in the far northwest corner of Los Angeles County. What was the board’s majority thinking?

Approving 19,000 new homes 70 miles from downtown L.A. is a...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Сб, 15 дек 2018 03:00:00 PST )

Swearing disloyalty to President Trump has debuted as a dramatic set piece for 2019. Ideally, this disloyalty-swearing aria is performed in Milanese street style: Armani sunglasses and a dashing mid-weight boule-shaped burnt orange coat from Max Mara.

On Tuesday, House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Сб, 15 дек 2018 03:10:00 PST )

After years of work and some ludicrous missteps, California’s annual report card on schools is finally up and measuring educational performance. It’s improved from its early iterations, and there’s a fair amount to like about it. But the new system is still lacking in many areas; the state shouldn’t...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Сб, 15 дек 2018 03:05:00 PST )

To the editor: As a British nurse living and working in California, I’ve got one thing to say on the subject of Brexit: Keep your opinions to yourself, Los Angeles Times!

How dare your editorial board suggest that a second referendum be held? How would you like it if Republicans decided they didn’t...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Сб, 15 дек 2018 03:00:00 PST )

Having been married to a teacher for the last 11-plus years, I must admit that I anticipated the backlash when deciding this week to publish a letter to the editor that noted the months of summer vacation in a school year and said teacher salaries should be set accordingly. This is an argument...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Сб, 15 дек 2018 03:00:00 PST )

After months of matching the Trump administration’s trade-war maneuvering in tit-for-tat fashion, the Chinese government has started making what appear to be peace offerings.

On Dec. 1 the two sides announced a tariff cease-fire, with the U.S. suspending a planned 150% increase in duties for 90...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Сб, 15 дек 2018 03:10:00 PST )

Los Angeles’ Abner Mares will pursue a world title in a fourth weight class Feb. 9 when he meets World Boxing Assn. super-featherweight champion Gervonta Davis at the newly named Pechanga Arena in San Diego.

The former San Diego Sports Arena that was once the home of the Clippers and Muhammad Ali’s...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Fri, 14 Dec 2018 21:45:00 PST )

Kyrie Irving scored 24 points in three quarters and the Boston Celtics beat the Atlanta Hawks 129-108 on Friday night for their eighth straight victory.

Irving also had five assists, five rebounds and four steals. He scored 12 points in the first quarter and helped Boston race to a 23-5 lead. The...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Fri, 14 Dec 2018 20:00:00 PST )

The Charges overcame a 16-point halftime deficit at Pittsburgh and a 14-point fourth-quarter deficit at Kansas City.

In between, they ground out a five-point victory at StubHub Center over the Cincinnati Bengals on a day when the offense managed only j two touchdowns and a lesser team could have...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Fri, 14 Dec 2018 18:25:00 PST )

John Hall, a sportswriter whose columns and stories appeared for more than four decades in L.A. newspapers, died Monday. He was 90.

Hall died at a hospice facility near his home in San Clemente, according to his wife, Toni. He was in good health until recently, and she said the cause of death was...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Fri, 14 Dec 2018 17:45:00 PST )

Holidays in the Movies A young boy (Peter Billingsley) has a big ask for Santa in the nostalgic 1983 holiday comedy “A Christmas Story,” based on the writings of humorist Jean Shepherd. With Melinda Dillon, Darren McGavin. Billy Wilder Theater, UCLA Hammer Museum, 10899 Wilshire Blvd., Westwood....

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Movie Reviews (Fri, 14 Dec 2018 17:00:00 PST )

Pacific Gas & Electric Co. continued to commit pipeline safety violations in the years after a gas explosion that killed eight people in the Bay Area suburb of San Bruno, regulators said Friday as they launched a new investigation into California’s largest utility.

The fresh accusations add to...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Fri, 14 Dec 2018 16:40:00 PST )

It doesn’t normally happen like this, the best players on a team so intertwined with the city in which they play. But in a league in which stars hunt for the best situations and most compatible rosters, the special relationship between Memphis and the two best Grizzlies happened organically, the...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Restaurant Reviews (Fri, 14 Dec 2018 15:15:00 PST )

Taking nods from a number of design elements endemic to traditional trading card games and combining those with the flexibility and ease of digitized play fields, Artifact brings a uniquely compelling twist to the TCG formula. The bulk of this comes from Valve’s tentpole franchise of late: Dota 2. Artifact remixes many of the core ideas, focusing on the essentials of MOBAs to bring new layers of tactical complexity to great effect. Establishing a broad number of possibilities allows for near-limitless experimentation and development of new and complex styles of play.

Those unfamiliar with the free-to-play behemoth, Dota 2, and its competitors (League of Legends, Heroes of the Storm, etc.) won’t need much additional context, but a grasp of the basics can go a long way. As with standard MOBAs, you’ll have three lanes that you share with your competitor. Monsters, heroes, creeps, and items all get funneled into one of these passages and are pit against one another. Each of you will vie for control of all three in succession, starting from left to right, marshaling what forces and powers you can to overpower your opponent and topple the tower sitting at the end.

Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4

In essence, the lanes act like as distinct play areas, though you do share a hand across them. Besides that, though what happens in one lane stays there. To win, you’ll either need to claim two of the three lanes, or manage to bring down your foe’s “ancient,” which appears only after you’ve taken a lane.

These basics are sticky to explain, but mercifully, pretty easy to grasp once you see them in action. Artifact offloads a good chunk of its calculations to computers, allowing it to be a lot more complex than a traditional card game. By taking some of that extra grunt work off of you, it broadens the possibility space beyond anything comparable. Because any number of monsters or heroes can be in each lane, it's possible that you’ll end up with 10 combat rounds or more across three lanes in a turn. That sounds like a lot, but Artifact offers up battle previews, detailing what will happen if you don’t respond. Likewise, the playable cards in your hand will glow a gentle blue, so you can save time and consider the ramifications of the play instead of burning your thoughts attempting to figure out what you even can play on top of what effect it would have.

Play proceeds in a series of rounds, where you’ll pass over each lane and resolve whatever relevant cards in sequence. Between each, though, you’ll have a chance to buy items and equipment to help in the next go around. Each creep you take down yields one gold, whereas an enemy hero yields five. Neither are necessary objectives in themselves, but creeps and heroes guard the towers, so most of the time you’ll need to be chipping away at them anyway, and the extra payout is a useful bonus that will--on occasion--affect which lane you choose to press through and when.

In truth, there’s a litany of micro-decisions like those that Artifact relies on to build itself into a fully fledged and shockingly nuanced trading card game. The fineries of play will take quite some time to master, and not because they are obtuse or particularly convoluted, but because of the tension between where, how, and when you choose to play. It can be to your advantage, for instance, to make one big push through a single lane if you don’t believe you can spread your forces effectively enough to nab two. But, even then, you’ll still need a capable defense to prevent your towers from being overrun.

No Caption Provided
Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4

All of this is covered in the tutorial, but developing a genuine sense of the game takes quite a while, simply due to the nature of its play. Normally this would be a positive trait, and the fact that learning nuances over time is encouraged is a helps create a satisfying, growth-oriented style of play. But that clashes a bit with Artifact’s pricing structure.

Buying the game gets you a starting deck as well as several booster packs to round out your starting set. But from there, you’ll either need to trade and sell cards on the real-currency marketplace to fill out your decks, or compete incredibly well to win them. Competing would be fine, too, but the number of matches you need to win and the rewards you get from there are scant enough that most new players will need to put in some extra cash.

The fineries of play will take quite some time to master, and not because they are obtuse or particularly convoluted, but because of the tension between where, how, and when you choose to play.

This has been helped somewhat by the post-launch addition of a free draft mode (previously it had been behind a paywall). Here you can play all you want and experiment with whatever cards come up in the draft. Players looking to build their actual decks, though, may be disappointed. I say may because the market’s prices are extremely variable, shifting quickly as the market gets more and more rare cards and the metagame evolves. It isn’t clear, however, at this stage, what developer Valve will be doing in terms of restricting card rarity to keep prices stable down the line--or if there are any such plans at all. It may be that in two weeks’ time, competitive decks are dramatically cheaper to field. As it is, Artifact is dramatically cheaper than high-end Magic or Hearthstone, but it may feel less welcoming to passive fans who want to avoid any significant financial investment.

In aggregate, though, Artifact works far more often than it doesn’t. While the volatility of the market is one thing, play on its own is more challenging and engaging than many of its contemporaries. Play moves remarkably fast, too, shuffling between the lanes and then back to the start sometimes in under a minute. It’s a lot to keep track of, but it’s put together well enough and propped up by enough card playability hints and subtle calculations that it rarely ceases to delight.

No Caption Provided

Production and animation help a good chunk with that, too. Play will frequently shift between the board as a whole and the specific play space on which you’re focusing. Between lanes, though, you’ll have a fluttering imp that manages your deck, carrying it seamlessly to the different play areas between rounds. They don’t affect play, only adding to the aesthetic presentation of the game and the visual language of how your deck and hand move across the board to each miniature arena, but they’re a nice touch. Similarly, the crack of a spell or the soft trickle of the stream that runs the length of the board are engrossing touches that bind the field together and give the game an added visual flair.

All-told, Artifact is a capable reimagining of modern trading card games. It plays quite a bit differently than just about any of its contemporaries--digital or not--and while the marketplace is volatile to say the least, there’s little evidence that the pricing is straight-up predatory. Just note, however, that the game is not free-to-play and be prepared to spend some additional bit of money coming in. It would be nice to see some more extensive options for those wanting to play by themselves or in non-competitive settings, but beyond that, Artifact is a great showing.

Read More

Source: GameSpot - Reviews (Thu, 06 Dec 2018 10:25:00 -0800)
'Spitak'

With a theatrical release timed to coincide with the anniversary of the devastating 1988 Armenian Earthquake, Alexander Kott’s “Spitak” is a spare, haunting, character-driven drama set in the immediate aftermath of the temblor that left more than 25,000 dead.

Hurrying back to Spitak, where...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Movie Reviews (Thu, 6 Dec 2018 11:45:00 PST )

Cut from the same crowd-coddling cloth as “The Full Monty,” Oliver Parker’s “Swimming with Men” is a lazily formulaic male-bonding comedy about a group of British blokes-turned-synchronized swimmers that feels like it has arrived about 20 years past its prime.

Meet Eric (Rob Brydon), a dour, self-pitying...

Read More

Source: Los Angeles Times - Movie Reviews (Wed, 5 Dec 2018 17:45:00 PST )

The Big Bash League, or BBL, is cricket's answer to the ever-increasing pace of modern life; a 20-over-a-side slogfest where smashing the ball out of the park to the sound of fireworks and loud rock music takes the place of five-day-long tests of endurance and patience. Big Bash Boom takes this concept and smashes it into the arcade game-o-sphere by introducing nice-looking power-ups, unlockable customizations, and a streamlined approach to gameplay that speeds up the action, while leaning into a goofiness that cricket games rarely embrace. But with a litany of technical problems and no meaningful tutorial to help you work out the basics, Big Bash Boom feels like it needs more time in the practice nets.

Big Bash cricket is all about smashing the heck out of every ball and scoring as many runs as possible, and Big Bash Boom does a superb job of recreating the buzzing atmosphere you'll find at the ground during a BBL match, complete with wild crowds, fireworks displays, and unintentionally terrifying-looking mascots. You can pick any of the eight licensed teams from either the BBL or Women's BBL, taking them to glory in a casual match, full tournament, or online head-to-head.

Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

When jumping straight into a casual match, you can customize match options, team lineups, and ball type, which includes a few fun varieties--pie, anyone? You're led out onto the pitch and greeted by real-world commentator Pete Lazer, though his occasionally charming reads come off as a series of one-liners instead of actual commentary, and they begin to grate after some repeats.

Out on the field is where Big Bash Boom shows off its main differences to past cricket games, including Ashes Cricket, which was by the same developer as Big Bash Boom. The action has been streamlined to cut out a lot of the dead air time that you tend to get at a cricket match, which gives the game its arcade feel. You're never asked to pick bowlers or select lineups. You can if you wish, but the game will otherwise make these calls to ensure a faster flow. The players all have NBA Jam-style big heads, which shows off the player likenesses in a way that's easy to appreciate. Faces are detailed, if a little robotic and expressionless, but the overall look works in context, especially combined with the great use of special effects to mark big shots.

No Caption Provided
Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

Batting and bowling feel more pick-up-and-play than in any other cricket game; however, the lack of a meaningful tutorial means things that should be obvious knowledge, like what the changing cursor colour on the pitch means, remain a mystery until you just happen to work it out through the natural course of playing. But that aside, it's simple enough to get into a match and start slogging balls left and right, with timing and shot selection all coming into play. Time it perfectly, and you'll probably make it sail over the ropes, but get it wrong and you might pop the ball up for an easy catch or swing and miss entirely. Bowling is a touch more complicated, involving selecting a bowl type to start the run in and then keeping the cursor on the pitch in place while timing your release. It often feels like you're up against it as a bowler; there's little you can do to avoid being belted around the park apart from bowling the occasional short ball, and you're limited to performing only one of those per over. Getting belted around every ball takes some getting used to, but thankfully if you'd rather spare yourself the embarrassment, you can always simulate the innings.

The inclusion of power-ups for batters and bowlers help pump up the excitement of a match, and you can activate these after filling a special meter by hitting runs and boundaries as a batter, or dot balls and wickets as a bowler. Each exhibits some excellent-looking animations and special effects, and you'll get some extra power for the next few balls. Bowlers can bowl twice as fast, fielders are able to run at double their speed, and batters can force slower throws from the outfield or hit twice as hard, sending loose balls into the stratosphere. It's immensely satisfying.

Everything you do in a match will earn you coins that you can put towards buying new in-match celebrations, which you're prompted to perform after hitting a big six or taking a wicket. While it's somewhat satisfying to rub it in your opponent's face, the lack of gameplay benefits makes showboating feel a little arbitrary. You can also purchase cosmetic customizations like new hats and helmets, but that's as far as personalization goes; disappointingly, there's no player or team editor.

No Caption Provided
Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

Beyond the excellent special moves and vibrant aesthetic, the rest of the game struggles to hide its seams, most notably when it comes to animations. Fielders will move about awkwardly when chasing the ball before settling and sending in the return throw, while batters often warp into place before setting off for a run. There are also some more obtrusive bugs that, when they hit, can change the outcome of a match. A few times I was called out for a catch on one side of the field when the camera made it look like the ball had gone in the opposite direction. I've also had catches made in the outfield seem as though they don't count, with my player harmlessly throwing the ball back to the keeper as though nothing happened--something that can be immensely frustrating.

Big Bash Boom's potential is clear. Despite its singular focus making it feel a little barebones when compared to other cricket titles, the shift towards arcade gameplay feels perfectly suited to the relatively flamboyant presentation of the BBL. But it's washed with bugs that affect the core of the experience, and those technical issues make it difficult to warm up to.

Read More

Source: GameSpot - Reviews (Mon, 03 Dec 2018 20:00:00 -0800)

A good rhythm game knows how to get you moving to the beat, but very rarely does it require your full physical exertion in the way that Beat Saber does. On one hand, Beat Saber is a delicately designed rhythm game that uses simple mechanics in increasingly complex combinations. On the other, it's a full-body workout--one that demands you get up and move to the many beats of its drum- and bass-heavy songs. It's a wonderful use of both virtual reality and motion control, with only a few campaign issues and a slightly disappointing lack of content holding it back.

Beat Saber is easy to pick up and understand immediately. You're equipped with two sabers (lightsabers in all but name), color-coded in red and blue. Each song plays out as a track of similarly color-coded blocks, each of which have arrow indicators signifying in which direction they need to be cut. You slice and dice your way through multiple songs, many of which mix up both speedy repetitive patterns with long avenues of tricky swiping angles that test your reflexes; there are also small hazards like explosive bombs and glowing red walls that you'll need to physically avoid. With difficulties ranging from the slow and simple Easy to the frankly ridiculous Expert, there's a gentle curve that lets you engage with Beat Saber on your own terms--from a light, manageable workout to a true test of your mobility and reaction times.

Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

PSVR support and the mandatory use of the Move controllers are what give Beat Saber its sense of motion. Beat Saber's blocks fly at you from the same starting point but can have wildly different trajectories that force you to stretch out to cut them. These can come whizzing past exclusively on your left-hand side before quickly transferring over to the right and flipping the pattern or alternate between low diagonal positions to a flurry of blocks flying overhead. The way Beat Saber continually uses rotations and last-minute position swaps gives its simple two-color system a lot of depth, which often requires deft motion tracking. The limitations of the PS4 camera have made this facet of PSVR tricky in the past, but Beat Saber features precise tracking, allowing for a high level of breadth to movement without impacting the feel of playing.

Beat Saber's songs do a good job of differentiating themselves from each other. "$100 Bills"” for example, is a satisfying exercise in pattern recognition that rides along a punchy bass track, while "Be There for You" shifts between slow and melodic verses into an adrenaline pumping chorus that uses devious pattern swaps to keep you on your toes. There's a lot of standard electro and alluring drum and bass, but Beat Saber does dabble in genres that you wouldn't immediately expect from its neon-brushed presentation and effects-heavy levels that elicit the feeling of attending an intense music festival. Coming across a new type of melody is refreshing after hours of dealing with similarly intense beats per minute, even if there aren't that many songs in total.

The PS4 version has five exclusive songs, each of which have tracks that fit their corresponding songs well and highlight their unique rhythms with clever block positioning. But on console, you lose the ability to download custom songs. Users on PC have been able to create songs using unofficial tools, greatly expanding Beat Saber's limited song library. There's more officially supported songs coming as paid DLC, but the selection is a little slim currently.

Modifiers alleviate the repetitive nature of the limited library to an extent. You can play songs with altered tracks that only allow you to use one saber or have directional arrows disappear as they get close to you. Only a handful of modifiers are available for each song, with an entirely new subset used in the game's campaign mode (which is exclusive to PS4 for the time being). These include challenges that ask you to not only complete a song but also move your arms to hit a collective distance travelled or achieve a high combo. Each of these pushes you to get better at songs you've likely already played, helping you inch closer to a perfect run in a natural way.

No Caption Provided
Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10

Some challenges are frustratingly counterintuitive, though. Certain modifiers will inexplicably limit the amount of movement you're allowed to make, which detracts from the energy that makes Beat Saber so exhilarating. Other modifiers that force you to keep below a certain combo or make a certain number of mistakes before the end of a stage feel obtrusive to your progress. They require you to actively play worse, manually breaking out of great streaks or purposefully making wrong moves in order to progress.

The campaign gives you branching paths to follow on your way to its conclusion, so some of these frustrating challenges can be avoided. But you'll have to engage with each of them at least once, and they are disorientating speed bumps in an otherwise exciting journey. But Beat Saber's campaign is an otherwise well-paced training ground for your growing abilities. Its difficulty ramps up fairly--you can't change it like you can in other modes--consistently challenging you while also gently nudging you out of your comfort zone so that you can improve.

Beat Saber is an exhilarating rush and an exhausting game to play in the best way. It has great music that is more varied than you might expect, complemented by smartly designed levels that marry their complex patterns perfectly to the beat. It's difficult to get bored of Beat Saber, especially thanks to its extensive campaign that pushes you to get better with each step up in difficulty. But that same campaign is also uneven at times with confusingly counterintuitive challenges, which might frustrate you to the point of taking a break. And when you do, you'll realize that Beat Saber is also currently thin on content, with only a handful of songs and no means to upload customs ones. Yet despite those flaws it remains consistently satisfying to play, and is certainly one of the best PSVR games you can buy right now.

Read More

Source: GameSpot - Reviews (Mon, 26 Nov 2018 15:35:00 -0800)


Search in globalheadlines.uk